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1


True or False. Using a corded telephone during a lightning storm is safe.


a. True b. False


2


Why do some outlets have three holes?


a. Provides more voltage b. The third prong is the "ground" c. To accommodate foreign appliances d. It keeps the plug from falling out


3


When using a portable generator in a power outage, you should:


a. connect generators directly to the household wiring only when an appropriate transfer switch is installed to prevent backfeed along power lines that poses a risk to utility lineworkers making repairs


b. position the generator outside the home and away from doors, windows and vents that can allow carbon monoxide to enter the home


c. make sure your generator is properly grounded


d. plug it into a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)


e. All of the above 4


The _______ industry alone sustained 52% of all workplace electrical fatalities.


a. natural resources and mining b. manufacturing c. trade, transportation and utilities d. construction


5


The most common scenario for electrocutions while using power tools is _________.


a. the equipment coming into contact with water


b. the equipment coming into contact with electrical wires


c. the equipment malfunctioned d. exposure to bare wires by grabbing a cord with cracked or broken insulation


SA ARE YOUFETY SAVVY? 6


Smoke alarm batteries should be changed every:


a. month b. 6 months c. year d. 2 years


7


You shouldn’t swim near docks or marinas because:


a. Boats may not see you and run you over


equipment like hooks


or boats that leak electricity into the water


d. All of the above 8


In a study conducted by Temple University’s Biokinetics Laboratory, what percent of children ages 2 to 4 years old were able to remove plastic outlet covers from the sockets in less than ten seconds?


a. 25% b. 50% c. 75% d. 100%


9


a. b. c.


d. 10


23 seconds 7 minutes 28 minutes 52 minutes


The proper way to safely move away from a downed power line is to _____ until you are 35 feet away.


a. take small hops with your feet together


keeping your feet together and on the ground at all times


c. skip so that only one foot is on the ground at a time


d. crawl on all fours 15 13 What age group has the highest risk


a. 15 years and under b. 21-35 years c. 50-64 years d. Adults over 65


14


Birds are able to perch on power lines without risk of injury because:


a. Those power lines do not have power running through them at that time


b. The unique skin on the feet of birds protects them


c. Sitting on one wire does not provide a ground or connect a circuit, so the current doesn’t leave the wire and continues on its path


d. Their bones are hollow allowing the current to pass through them without harm


When a new version of the National Electrical Code


jurisdiction ________ must follow it. ® is adopted by a


a. all buildings currently being utilized b. new buildings c. renovations d. b and c


12 11


True or False. You can be electrocuted using a tree trimmer near a power line even if you don’t touch the wires.


a. True b. False


True or False. Swallowing a button-cell battery can be fatal.


a. True b. False


7 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY MONTH 2014 ・ ESFI.ORG


May 2014


News Magazine


11


Answers: (1)b, (2)b, (3)e, (4)d, (5)b, (6)c, (7)d, (8)d, (9)a, (10)b, (11)a, (12)a, (13)d, (14)c, (15)d


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