This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Velasquez and Cox Complete Journeyman Lineman Training Congratulations goes out to


Alex Velasquez and Brady Cox for completing the Powerline Training Program for Journeyman Lineman! Alex and Brady were among 16 graduates honored during a luncheon at


the Electric Oklahoma Association of Cooperatives annual


meeting, April 7th in Norman. The apprentice-training program


has been developed in cooperation with the Safety & Loss Control Department


of the Oklahoma


Association of Electric Cooperatives. The course is comprised of twelve units, each including on the job training, homework, specialized time tracking, classes and testing.


The


individual training units are arranged in sequence to develop the knowledge and skill level of the apprentice over a period of four years to progress to the level of journeyman.


Each of the twelve units consists of homework that must be completed with a unit average of not less than 70%. A unit exam is then taken which must also have a score of at least 70%. Before certification, a final exam is taken and signed approvals from instructors and supervisors must be obtained. Upon the seccessful completion


of all twelve units, Velasquez and Cox received a certificate approved by the US Department of Labor and the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training Program and each is certified as Journeyman Lineman. Harmon Electric


along with


OAEC is committed to providing a safe training and work environment. The development of employee skills and the practice of safe working habits on the job are the goals of this training program.


Brady Cox receiving his Journeyman Lineman certificate. Practical Pointers for


May is National Electrical Safety Month, and Harmon Electric is joining with the Electrical Safety Foundation International to raise awareness about potential home electrical hazards and the importance of electrical safety. This year’s campaign, “Back to the Basics,” challenges consumers to make home electrical safety assessments a priority. According to the Consumer Electronics Association, the average home today has a minimum of three televisions, two DVD players, at least one digital camera, one desktop computer, and two cell phones. Modern homes run on electricity, but if you don’t properly maintain your


electrical products they can


create hazards. The good news is that eliminating


electrical hazards from your home doesn’t have to be difficult


National Electrical Safety Month or expensive.


Many homes and their electrical systems were built before most modern- day home electronics and appliances were even invented. Today’s increased demand for energy can overburden an older home’s electrical system. The following tips will help you and


identify eliminate


hazards to protect family, and your home:


electrical yourself, your


• Make sure entertainment centers and computer equipment have plenty of space around them for ventilation. • Use extension cords as a temporary solution, and never as a permanent power supply. • Do not place extension cords in


high traffic areas, under carpets, or across walkways, where they pose a potential tripping hazard.


• Use a surge protector to protect your computer and other


electronic


equipment from damage caused by voltage changes. • Heavy reliance on power strips that you have too


is an indication


few outlets to address your needs. Have additional outlets installed by a qualified, licensed electrician. • Keep liquids, including drinks, away from electrical items such as televisions and computers.


Electrical


education among consumers, families, employees, and communities


safety awareness and will


prevent electrical fires, injuries, and fatalities. For more information about ESFI and electrical


safety, visit www. electrical-safety.org. 56102


Alex Velasquez receiving his Journeyman Lineman certificate.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166