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TODAY’S TEENS ARE ‘DIGITAL FIRST’


A survey of more than 1,000 UK 13–17-year-olds points to a future workforce that is ‘digital first’ in everything it does. The findings were


published in a report by Logicalis UK, entitled ‘The Realtime Generation: Rise of the Digital First Era’. Conducted by research


company Youngbods, the survey revealed the digital life of the average UK teen includes six digital devices and access to 192GB of storage, while two-thirds are creating and actively sharing videos online. This connected generation


consider Maths, English, Science and ICT the four most essential subjects to study; and IT and Science top career


ChildLine sees Cyberbullying conce


ChildLine has said it has seen a large increase in the number of children contacting it about online bullying. The charity’s Can I Tell You Something?


report highlighted an 87% rise in contacts about online bullying, whilst bullying contacts overall increased by 8%. Young people have told the charity


that the 24-hour nature of online bullying means there’s no escape and it can lead to very serious feelings of isolation, low self-esteem and, in a few desperate cases, suicide. Esther Rantzen, founder of ChildLine,


said: “This report is a real wake-up call. Far too many of the nation’s children seem to be struggling and in despair. It’s so important that we support children to talk about issues and look out for signs that they’re not able to cope. “No mater how hard pressed we are, we


must commit to giving children time and space to talk about their lives. If they are concealing unhappiness, encourage them to open up and if they can’t talk to you, maybe they can talk to ChildLine. Peter Wanless, CEO of the NSPCC added:


“The issues facing children today are very different from those that faced us as children. Stranger danger, for example, rarely comes up in contacts to ChildLine


choices. The findings also demonstrate a demand for change in the workplace of the future. Gerry Carroll, author of


the report at Logicalis UK, commented: “The statistics show a highly connected, commercially aware generation that is pursuing careers in STEM industries, and whose instinctive ICT skills could bring innovation and greater productivity to the workplace. “This generation has the


potential to deliver a digital dividend; an economic return on their ICT skills. But it won’t happen by itself. The challenge for government, the education system and employers is to sustain this generation’s interest in the professions and industries that give Britain its competitive edge.”


A RECENT REPORT HIGHLIGHTED AN


RISE IN CONTACTS ABOUT ONLINE BULLYING


87% Thousands of computers “ineffective”


R E AD THE FU LL WH I TE PA P E R AT : w w w.ed t ec h n o l og y .c o. u k


According to latest data from the British Educational Suppliers


Association (BESA), the number of computers purchased by primary and secondary schools has declined drastically in


recent years. Not only have the types


of devices changed but also the way in which ICT is now accessed and


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