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Grain Adhesion Science Today, a totally new bond platform features an exclusive


chemistry that delivers an entirely new grain adhesion science, resulting in improved product versatility across a wide range of precision grinding applications. Te chemistry of holding the abrasive grain in the bond


matrix for the precise amount of time is referred to as “grain adhesion science.” Our company’s Vitirum3


, for example,


features a new formulation that substantially increases the module of elasticity or strength of the bond. Tis allows for less bond to be used to provide the same holding power on the individual abrasive grain. An improved holding power using a lower bond-to-abra-


sive ratio exposes a larger grain surface area, which improves the standard bond-part interaction. Te thinner bond posts provide reduced bond-part interaction and improved coolant flow for better chip clearance, which enables the wheel to provide such benefits as: increased cut rate; minimized heat build-up; reduced metallurgical damage; lower power con- sumption; reduced grinding forces on the part; and improved part quality.


Thinner bond posts provide reduced bond-part interaction and improved coolant flow for better chip clearance.


requiring intricate part profiles, where the less-frequent wheel dressing to regenerate profiles provides: better part geometry and integrity; less downtime for dressing, increasing produc- tivity; lower abrasive costs; and reduced dresser wear and dresser replacement costs.


Higher Operating Speeds Precision machinery is increasingly being produced with


higher operating speeds to improve productivity. Tese higher speeds mandate that manufacturers provide wheels that are tested and rated for the higher speeds, in order to take advan- tage of the higher machine speeds. A higher strength bond provides enough wheel strength to allow soſter grades to be qualified for high-speed grinding. At the same grade, a Vit- rium3


wheel is 20% stronger. Higher operating speeds provide


faster stock removal, increased feed rates, and significantly increased throughput and production.


Energy and Cost Reductions Improved grinding wheel designs—such as the Vitrium3





allow work with higher feed rates, speed and pressure, to significantly increase production while using fewer wheels. It also requires a lower firing temperature than standard vitrified bonds. Tis reduces energy consumption in the following ways: • reduced energy consumed when operating existing machinery at the same production level;


• fewer wheels, less transportation, less fuel; • optimal firing temperatures, reduced energy costs. Total cost reduction is a goal of all aerospace manufactur-


Gear grinding application.


ing organizations. While on average, abrasives consumables only account for about 3%, machinery and labor account for 58% of total manufacturing budgets. With a 20% decrease in cycle time per part, there will be a reduced total cost per part of more than 15%. ✈


Aerospace & Defense Manufacturing 2013 153


A higher strength bond provides superior grain holding


properties, significantly improving wheel form and corner holding. Tis is especially important in aerospace applications


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