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(IDs) and outside diameters (ODs). But the challenge of holding required tolerances really increases when dealing with small parts made from bar stock measuring only 0.630" (16 mm) in diameter or with those parts involving long tool overhangs. “When you have a small diameter tool sticking out of a holder as much as 2" and


running at a high spindle speed, you better have reliable, highly precise toolholding with extremely low runout. For us, maintaining tolerances under those conditions is definitely easier with the accurate toolholding of our Rego-Fix collets and holders,” said Kott. “In addition to part tolerances, the precision of the tooling is mandatory for achieving our part surface finish requirements, and those can vary from Ra


32 to Ra 63 and better.”


Rego-Fix standard ER collets provide a TIR of 0.0004" (0.01 mm) or less over their entire clamping range and accurately clamp tool shanks ranging in size from 0.0079 up to 1.3386" (0.2 up to 34.0 mm) in diameter. The fast rapid traverse and maximum spindle speeds of today’s advanced linear-


motor Swiss-style machine tool technology have drastically reduced Swiss Automa- tion’s part cycle times over the years to an average between 20 seconds and 2.5 min- utes. The shop’s latest Swiss-style machines also allow for in-place tool indexing that reduces non-cut times by eliminating the need for moving the tool away from the part for that operation. Most important, the newer machines provide B-axis capability for angled drilling—another operation that, according to Kott, definitely requires the high precision of Rego-Fix tooling, especially when holes intersect with other cross holes. Any part requiring cross, angled or standard drilling is done only with Rego-Fix tooling, said Kott. The shop uses the company’s ER 11, ER 16, ER 20 and ER 25 collets—as well as its ER 16/DM metallic sealed collets for high-pressure through- tool coolant and collet sleeves/holders, many of which are 1" (25.4 mm) in diameter. Every machine uses the tooling in their live gang tooling positions. On each Swiss-style machine at Swiss Automation, there can be 10 positions on the turrets, and some of those individual positions can hold two tools for a total of 20. In some cases, machines are equipped with triple holders, so the total number of tools increases to 30, meaning three Rego-Fix collet holders will be used at one tool-turret position. Kott described a typical Swiss machine setup: “For our normal M-style Citizen Swiss


machine, we will load them with 9–10 gang tools—four of which can be live and use ER collets for drilling, cross drilling and spot centering. There are also three indepen- dent back-working stations, and if those are doing drilling, they too will have a Rego-Fix holder and collet. Machine turrets then provide nine usable positions out of 10, or they can be the type that holds double that amount. In which case, we will load 20 grooving and/or boring tools. On average, each machine can potentially have between 25 and 30 tool positions, all loaded with a Rego-Fix collet and sleeve,” Kott said. Rego-Fix’s high-precision toolholders require a lot less “indicating in” during


machine setups, which also contributes to shortening setup times. “We have never experienced any issues such as inconsistent holder sizes or excessive runout causing chatter or taper with the Rego-Fix tooling. We found tooling that works, and we have been sticking with it,” said Kott. ME For more information from Rego-Fix Tool Corp., go to www.rego-fix.com, or phone 317-870-5959.


September 2013 | ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com 125


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 


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 


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 


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