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Because it takes on the troublesome jobs, Hansen works


with some tough materials, the most predominant being tita- nium. In fact, the shop has so much experience in machining the material that it touts itself as a “titanium expert” and one that has perfected its machining of the material, in particular during lights-out operations. According to Lay, processing titanium efficiently


requires a combination of machining techniques and advanced machine tools such as the Mazaks. Among the techniques, the two used most oſten are high- speed machining and what he referred to as “sneaking up on a part”—meaning the part is rough machined, checked, and straightened, then machined some more, checked, and again straightened. When processing parts through the Palletech


System, the shop typically rough machines them on the HCN 8800-II then finishes them in single setups on the Integrex e-1060V/8 II using five-axis cutting. Te five-axis machine helps the shop generate its required part surface finishes, which can range from Ra


125 to Ra 63. Hansen’s rough-machining operations usually


involve a lot of material removal. A perfect example of this is a particularly troublesome 6AL-4V-titanium part for an aircraſt nacelle. Te large part begins as a 270-lb (121.5-kg) piece of raw material and, aſter machining, weighs only 70 lb or 31.5 kg. However, as that much material is machined away, explained Lay, parts will heat up, move and warp. To prevent heat buildup and part warping, Hansen


uses, in addition to high-pressure coolant, high- speed machining. For this machining technique, the Integrex e-1060V/8 II provides a maximum machin- ing feed rate of 42,000 mm/min (1653 ipm), while the HCN 8800-II is up to 60,000 mm/min (2362 ipm). Such high speeds are significantly beneficial, particu- larly when the shop is trying to control heat buildup and shorten cycle times for parts that can require over 20 hours’ worth of machining. Although the high-speed technique involves


an increased number of passes, it actually reduces machining cycle times as compared with running heavy depths-of-cut at slower speeds. Additionally, there is less stress on the part, and the technique is stable, which, according to Lay, makes it more conducive for use in lights-out operations. Along with high-speed machining, Hansen will “sneak up”


Hansen’s Inegrex e-1060V/8 II finish cuts a titanium aerospace part.


“We have the work, and we are constantly opening up


on a part’s finished size. Tis sequence of steps is repeated a few times until finished part size is achieved. Te method may be a bit more time consuming, but when the raw material for one titanium part can be worth upwards of $12,000 before even being touched by a cutting tool, it is well worth it.


new capacity by streamlining our operations and incorpo- rating systems such as the Palletech that allow us to run untended with confidence,” said Lay, “so that we can provide our customers with the highest quality work and the shortest delivery times.” ✈


This article was edited by Yearbook Editor Michael Anderson from information provided by Mazak Corp.


Aerospace & Defense Manufacturing 2013 73


As Hansen continues to target such troublesome aero-


space parts and build on its titanium machining expertise, Lay said it will further grow and invest and look to manu- facturing technology such as that from Mazak to increase efficiency and competitiveness.


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