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er, even farmers with bigger trac- tors, 50 horse- power and up,” he says. “The drawback


with the PTO is they’re awkward and are hard to hook up and store.” Ninety-fi ve percent of the post hole diggers sold at Farm Implement are hydraulic for the same reasons. Even on tractors, Gilliland notes, “it’s just easier to hook up.” Many of his cus- tomers are retired couples with small operations, so they have an additional concern: price. That’s why his staff asks customers, “How many holes are you digging?”


If the customer doesn’t dig a lot of holes and wants to save money, the PTO might be a better choice because PTO units cost less, he explains.


Stock to Sell


Sales are predetermined by the end user, says Hardie. Because a custom- er knows if he needs an auger or not — and because $2,500-$2,800 is “not a major expense” — he says augers are easy to sell.


“I sold 12-15 [Edge augers] last fall with no sales pitch,” he says. “They sell themselves.”


If customers are unsure, he relies


Danuser’s EP series heavy-duty auger system is mounted to a skid steer quick attach front-end loader using an offset mount allowing the operator to see the auger.


on personal experience to guide them. Before he started selling farm equip- ment, Hardie logged 13 years working for an electrical contractor, during which time he personally dug 4,000 holes, so he recognizes equipment quality and durability. “We don’t spend a lot of time push-


ing them,” Hardie indicates. Instead, he relies on the reputation of the dig- ger and his dealership. “There are no middle-of-the-road attachments.” “We chose CE Attachments because it’s a brand with a solid reputation for quality and durability — characteristics important to our customers.” The company’s 1650 CL model is built tough, Hardie explains, which is why it accounts for 9.9 out of every 10 sales. It also fi ts a lot of machines, making it a versatile choice to stock, says Hardie. While Farrens doesn’t necessarily believe that augers sell themselves, he says his customers either want them or they don’t.


 DANUSER SM40 HAMMER POST DRIVER • Operates like a drop hammer with no springs, cylinders or return lines


• Full stroke achieved with every cycle for maximum impact energy


• Hammer does not strike top of posts • Grapple option picks up post from ground without additional hydraulics or controls; tilt option tilts up to 20 degrees to left or right


Indicate No.201 on inquiry card or visit RuralLifestyleDealer.com/RS


 EDGE POST


POUNDER/PULLER ATTACHMENT • Ideal for agricultural applications or property line fences


• 50,000 lb. impact force drives posts quickly and effi ciently


• Drives wooden or steel posts as wide as 10 in. and as long as 10 ft.


• Multi-functional; pulls posts effort- lessly


Indicate No.202 on inquiry card or visit RuralLifestyleDealer.com/RS


“You can’t talk a guy into it if he doesn’t have a need in [the next] 30-60 days,” Farrens says.


But if he does need it, you better have it in stock. They are an impulse item, Gilliland believes, so it’s impor- tant to have them on hand. Farm Implement has as many as 25 in stock at any time.


“People want to dig holes today — maybe it’s a nice day or they have help on hand. If they have to wait two weeks to get an auger, they’ll either


52 RURAL LIFESTYLE DEALER  SPRING 2013


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