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Educational Lighting


Bright Sparks


Lighting can play a huge role in improving the atmosphere and productivity at educational facilities.


Schools are huge users of electricity, and this eats into the minimal budgets that they are afforded. As such, it is really important for educational lighting to be as efficient as possible. Frequently lighting is left on for a full school day regardless of room occupancy, which can be a huge expense and a waste of energy. The use of presence detectors can be an excellent way to reduce energy consumption by ensuring lights are only used when needed. Steinel (UK) Ltd has recently helped to implement a lighting upgrade, complete with presence detectors, at Malcolm Arnold Academy in Northampton. Existing fluorescent lighting that was in use at the site was not providing a good quality of light for the students to


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study by, and control gear within the fittings was interfering with brand new interactive whiteboards. As such, it was decided that something had to change. “Lights throughout the academy tended to be switched on at 6:30am every morning and not switched off until late at night,” comments Howard Parkinson, Business Development Manager at Malcolm Arnold Academy. “Classrooms are in use for just seven to nine hours a day, but the lights could be left on for 16 hours a day. Corridors are occupied for even less time – only for brief periods between lessons – but, again, the lights were on all day”. Luckily, Malcolm Arnold Academy was able to secure a government- backed loan for the project, via the Salix initiative. Steinel presence detectors


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