This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
choosing the right species and location for trees and bushes. Trees that grow too close to electric lines can create hazards and cause power outages.


Plan ahead when planting S


PRING is a popular season for tackling outdoor projects, but don’t sacrifice safety for beautification when sprucing up your yard. It is important to be aware of electrical hazards while planting. Always seek assistance from professionals when


Children can become victims of electric shock when they climb trees that have grown too close to the power lines. Trees growing into power lines can also create electrical hazards for people who might be trimming branches, hanging lights or otherwise working around them.


“Trees provide many aesthetic, environmental and economic benefits,” said Northeast


Oklahoma Electric Cooperative Safety Director Bret Boyd. “But everyone needs to be aware of the dangers and risks created when trees grow into power lines and the impor- tance of calling the utility or utility locator service before beginning any landscaping project.” Take the time to research tree selections by consulting your local arborist, tree nursery


or utility. These experts can provide assistance in designing a beautiful yard with plantings appropriate for each area of the landscape. Trees can provide economical cooling in the summer, as well as a wind-break for harsh winter winds. In addition, trees help combat the effects of pollution by absorbing carbon dioxide (CO2). When trees grow, they take energy from the sun and combine it with CO2 from the air to photo- synthesize. This makes trees a natural “carbon sink” or, a living source of carbon reduction. Some trees are better suited for this task than others and, accord- ing to the U.S. Department of Energy, tree species that grow quickly and live long are ideal carbon sinks. Choosing the right tree is especially crucial when it


comes to power lines. Trees can conduct electricity and create a safety hazard if grown close to electric lines. Power outages or momentary interruptions can occur when branches come into contact with over- head lines. Electrical arcing and sparking from a wire to a nearby branch can also cause fires.


“Keep in mind expected height when you purchase trees to plant this year,” Boyd said.


“Just because a tree is far from the power line right now, doesn’t mean it always will be.” If you have trees that appear to be growing into power lines, contact your electric


utility. Never try to prune them yourself. Utilities have or can recommend skilled profes- sionals trained to safely prune and trim trees for electric line clearance. To avoid future electrical hazards, safe planting tips to remember include: • Consider mature height of trees. Never plant a tree near a power line that could grow


within 25 feet of it. A mature height of less than 15 feet is recommended for trees planted near power lines. • Do not plant near underground utility services. Tree roots can interfere with under-


ground pipes, cables and wires. Future repairs to these facilities could damage nearby plants and trees and require removal. • Keep areas around electric meters, transformers or other electrical equipment free of


any vegetation that could limit utility service access. • Before digging, call the local underground utility locator service to mark the location


of underground utilities so that accidental contact, damage and injuries can be avoided. “There are many beautiful varieties of trees and shrubs that provide color, screening,


shade and enhance the quality of life in our communities and environment,” said Boyd. “Consider the types of trees that co-exist well with power lines and the environment to avoid the need for trimming for line clearance.”


Northeast Connection is published monthly as an effective means of communicating news, information and innovative thinking that enhances the profitability and quality of life for members of Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative.


Please direct all editorial inquiries to Communications Specialist Clint Branham at 800-256-6405 ext. 9340 or email clint.branham@neelectric.com.


Vinita headquarters: Four and a half miles east of Vinita on Highway 60/69 at 27039 South 4440 Road.


Grove office: 212 South Main.


Business hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Offices are closed Saturday, Sunday and holidays.


A representative is available 24 hours at: 1-800-256-6405


If you experience an outage, please check your switch or circuit breaker in the house and on the meter pole to be sure the trouble is not on your side of the service. If you contact us to report service issues or discuss your account, please use the name as it appears on your bill, and have both your pole number and account number ready.


Officers and Trustees of NEOEC, Inc. President Dandy Allan Risman


Vice President John L. Myers


Secretary-Treasurer Benny L. Seabourn


Harold W. Robertson


Member Sharron Gay


Member James A. Wade


Member Bill R. Kimbrell


Member Jack Caudill Member


Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Everett L. Johnston


District 5 District 4 District 2 District 3 District 1 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9


NEOEC Management Team Anthony Due General Manager


Larry Cisneros, P.E. Manager of Engineering Services


Susanne Frost Manager of Office Services


Cindy Hefner Manager of Public Relations


Connie Porter Manager of Financial Services


Rick Shurtz Manager of Operations


May 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146