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Tornado Safety - O


What you need to know NOW!


May 22, 2011, an EF-5 tornado hit the city of Joplin, Mo., leaving an estimated 157 people dead. On May 24, 2011, deadly tornados claimed 18 additional lives in Oklahoma (10), Kansas (2), and Arkansas (6). Tornados have also been very active this spring.


Hopefully, learning the difference between a tornado watch and tornado warning and knowing what to do when the warning is issued will help save lives. The current average lead-time for tornado warnings is 13 minutes. NOAA Research is working to increase tornado warning lead-times much further.


Harmon Electric Member, Jack Givens, Inducted


Into Oklahoma Agriculture Hall of Fame During a special ceremony at the state Capitol, Gov. Mary Fallin announced Jack M. Givens the recipient of the Governor’s Outstanding Achievement Award in Agriculture. The Greer County farmer became the 15th member of the Agriculture Hall of Fame. To humble beginnings in


southwestern Oklahoma, Givens was born the third of five children. Raised during lean times and the Depression, Givens began school at Ladessa in a one-room school house. He later transferred to Mangum and graduated from high school in 1940. All of Givens’ siblings graduated from Oklahoma State University. Givens himself was a student for three years. Hitchhiking to get there, he worked at the library, earning 15 cents an hour, while other students went to ballgames. While a student, Givens joined the ROTC and pledged the Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity. Soon after the attacks on Pearl Harbor, Givens’ suspended his education and began full-time training.


Oregon, and later Europe, Givens earned the rank of 1st Lieutenant and recalls turning 21 on the ship. He walked and crawled across Europe where he was shot in the arm and leg and had his jaw broken. While overseas, he was captured and placed in prison camp in Germany. His service to the country was recognized with a Bronze Star, combat Infantry Badge and three Purple Hearts. After the war and returning to


Stationed in Camp Adair,


met through mutual friends his wife Helen Jane. Together they raised their five children instilling in them the importance of family, Christian values and a strong work ethic.


A Tornado Watch is issued by the NOAA Storm Prediction Center and means tornadoes are possible in your area. Remain alert for approaching storms.


A Tornado Warning is issued by your local National Weather Service office and means a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar – time to take cover!


military


the states, Givens accomplished another goal and completed a degree in agricultural education and soils from Oregon State University. For a time, he worked for the Army in Alaska. It was on a visit back to Oklahoma that he


After settling his family in Oklahoma, he rented farmland and worked for the post office and eventually became a postmaster. He would buy farms as he saved money. Having experienced the Dust Bowl first hand, he always purchased irrigated farms. Primarily an irrigated cotton farmer, Givens also raised wheat and cattle. Today, he rents out the farming operation but is still involved with the cattle side. Over the years, Givens’ commitment to working hard reached far beyond his own cotton fields. He served two terms as Chairman of the Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation Service. A lifelong member of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau, he served first as the Southwest Director and later as the State President of the organization. He served the cotton industry on a national scale acting as director for both the Cotton Incorporated Board and the National Cotton Council. Givens has also been a Regent and Chairman for Oklahoma State University and A&M Colleges. He has also been an active member of the Mangum First Baptist Church. Secretary of Agriculture Jim Reese presented Givens with a citation for his contribution to the Oklahoma agriculture industry. This July, Givens will celebrate his 90th birthday, one day after the country turns 236.


occurrence couldn’t be more fitting for a man who has spent a lifetime putting his country, state and the agriculture industry before himself.


This


Listen to NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards or commercial radio/television for tornado warnings and instructions. If you hear a “Tornado Warning” seek safety immediately.


Indoors: l


l


klahoma lies in what is known as Tornado Alley, an area that has more tornados than other parts of the U.S. On Sunday,


Abandon mobile homes - they are not safe even when tied down.


Go to basement or interior room on the lowest floor (bathroom or closet without windows, under stairs). Get under a sturdy piece of furniture.


l Cover yourself with a mattress or blanket. l Put bicycle helmets on kids. l Put on sturdy shoes.


l Put infants in car seats (indoors!). l


l DO NOT open your windows!


In a vehicle: l


Leave vehicle for sturdy shelter or drive out of the tornado’s path.


l DO NOT hide under overpasses - they provide no shelter. l


Last resort actions - stay in your vehicle or abandon for a roadside ditch.


Outdoors: l


Find a culvert or cave.


l Find something to hang onto. l Lie flat in a ditch. l Cover your head.


http://www.nws.noaa.gov/


If you have time, gather prescription medications, wallet and keys.


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