This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
C A N A D I A N MAY 2012


V A L


ELECTRALITE Dollar General opens country store


SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Dollar General opened at 33991 Lake Road in Shawnee in July 2011. Ever since, the store has been busy serving customers. The store is one of the many retail businesses to be- come members of Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative. Dollar General chose this location for a number of rea- sons, including demographic trends, traffic patterns, com-


petitive factors and customer needs, among others. This location was a great fit for Dollar General, allowing the retailer to meet customers’ needs with a convenient location. Dollar General opens stores in convenient, neighborhood locations so customers don’t have to drive far to shop. It’s small, easy-to-access and makes shopping quick and easy. The average customer gets in and out in 10 minutes or less. Dollar General is a one-stop shop for everyday essentials such as health and beauty products, cleaning supplies, basic clothing, gifts, pet products and much more.


Dollar General stores employ six to 10 people. The company is committed to all the communities it serves. The retailer has a long-standing tradition of supporting literacy and education. At the cash register of every Dollar General store, customers will find a brochure on how to obtain free literacy and adult education services. The Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $63 million to nonprofit organizations and schools that focus on literacy and education.


Dollar General has 10,000 stores in 39 states; 312 of these stores are in Oklahoma.


Program keeps trees from hindering service more conductive.


By Rusty Pritchett, CVEC Vegeta- tion Management Director


It is springtime; we’ve survived the winter with no major outages from storms or ice, like we have in the


past. God is blessing us with a new year of life with the beauty of nature, with the green grass, flowers, wildlife all around us and the trees leafing out changing the countryside from brown to green. We all want perfect electrical service with no interruptions on our computers and TV’s. Due to the nature of electricity it is always looking for a path to neutral, when it finds a path that’s when we have blinks and outages due to the fault of going to neutral. Trees are a major cause for these interrup- tions in electrical service when they provide the path for the fault especially in the spring and summer when the sap is up making them


The way electrical distribution systems are made the circuits can cover a large area, from the substation to lines down to breakers to more lines then fused lines with custom- ers all along the way. Depending on where the tree is located that caused the fault; one tree can affect a large number of customers. CVEC is required by the Corporation Commission to maintain a good Right- Of-Way program to provide good reliable service to the customers. CVEC employees, being member oriented, is doing its best to achieve this objective before the regulation from the commission. A good maintenance program ultimately provides better service, less down time, and lower line loss all com- bined being more efficient.


This last year CVEC converted from paper to GIS mapping and record keeping helping management be more efficient in determining cycle times and problem areas. With almost 6000 miles of distribution line, controlling the vegetation in the ROW is a Continued on page 3


L


E Y The power of human connections By George


Growing up I occasionally was allowed to watch the story of George Jetson and his boy, Elroy, as they dealt with the trials and technology of some future century.


It


appeared there was always enough energy to run all of their futuristic electronic gad- gets that could perform almost any task we could imagine. When you are 10 years old you can hardly wait until you are old enough to drive (fly) one of those super fast “bubble” flying machines that could take you anywhere you needed to go with no worries of muddy roads or even roads at all. I believed I would be flying one of those fancy contraptions by now. I don’t remember if they told us what the energy source for those transportation bubbles was, but I am sure it was zero emissions. I am still waiting and hoping. Early in my school years we were taught that “energy is neither created nor destroyed.” I think that is still an accepted principle of science. That means we still have as much energy available as we ever did. So we can’t have an energy problem, only a technology problem, which eventu- ally, if the world lasts long enough we will solve. Of course when I was going to high school we were told that the place we were at the time was once covered with several feet of ice and that we were headed toward another ice age. We were told not to worry because the “deep freeze” was many, many generations into the future and there was nothing we could do about it anyway. Last night on the television news a


large explosion on our sun was reported. They had pictures taken by satellites in space showing the massive eruption on the surface of the sun. This explosion on the sun has propelled a large “cloud” of highly charged energy particles headed toward Earth at 4 million miles per hour. The possibility exists that this energy charged “cloud” will knock out our satellites and may even disrupt the national electrical power grid in some areas. We are all con- nected. At 4 million miles per hour, it doesn’t take long to travel the 93 million miles to Earth from the sun. We will prob- ably know the results of this impact before I finish this column. I will wait until then


Continued on page 2


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146