This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MAY 2012


Know How to Survive Auto Accidents Involving Power Lines


Instincts tell us to flee danger. Unfortu- nately, in vehicle accidents that bring down power lines, these natural inclinations can lead to tragic results.


PEC and Safe Electricity wants everyone to know: If your car hits a power pole, or otherwise brings a power line down, stay in your vehicle and wait until the electric utility arrives on the scene and ensures that lines have been de-energized. If you come upon or witness an accident involving toppled power poles and lines, don’t leave your vehicle to approach the scene.


According to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, tens of thousands of accidents each year occur where power poles are struck by cars or large equipment. Each one of


In the vast majority of those incidents, the safest place to remain is inside the car. Only in the rare instance of fire should people exit a vehicle. Then, they must know how to do so safely, jumping free and clear, keeping their feet together continually while hopping away. Since it’s often difficult to do this without creating a path for current to flow, one should get out only if forced to. The safest thing to do is stay inside the vehicle.


“When people are involved in a car


The teens in this car crash knew to stay in the car until the power lines that had fallen were de- energized, thanks to a demonstration by their local electric cooperative. Source: Safe Electricity


these accidents has the potential to bring down power lines. Surviving the accident itself might not be enough to stay alive without awareness of the right moves to make.


How Time Flies


• a complimentary shower timer; • two energy efficient CFLs; • entry into PEC’s 75th set on June 1, 2012;


accident, electricity is usually the last thing on anyone’s mind,” Safe Electricity Executive Director Molly Hall notes. “We’re often more concerned about whether anyone was injured, or how badly the vehicle is damaged. We forget that by exiting the vehicle, we’re risking


bodily exposure to thousands of volts of electricity from downed power lines.”


Source: Safe Electricity, a safety outreach program of the Energy Education Council.


with E-Bill and Paperless Billing


During May, take advantage of E-Bill and/or Paperless Billing, and also receive the following:


1040100706 Anniversary commemorative his/her watch • entry into PEC’s Christmas Appliance drawing on December 7, 2012. People’s Powerline


Dr. Laurin Patton - Ada, Chairman & President Eldon Flinn - Fittstown, Vice Chairman Jack Lambert - Ada, Secretary


BOARD OF TRUSTEES:


Bob Thomas - Coalgate, Assistant Secretary./Treas. Matt Holder - Sulphur, Trustee


People's Powerline is published monthly by


People's Electric Cooperative P.O. Box 429, Ada, OK 74821


Business Hours


7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday (877) 456-3031 or (580) 332-3031(Ada Area)


24 Hour Outage Reporting System: (877) 272-1500 or


(580) 272-1500 (Ada Area)


IMPORTANT DATES Bills mailed ............................31st Bills should be paid by the .....10th Cutoffs made .........................20th


Providing electricity and energy


service to over 20,000 meters in the following 11 south central Oklahoma counties: Atoka, Carter, Coal, Garvin, Hughes, Johnston, McClain, Murray, Pittsburg, Pontotoc and Seminole.


STEPS TO FOLLOW IF YOUR


ELECTRICITY GOES OFF 1. Check your fuse or breaker box. 2. Check with your neighbors. Are they off? Have they reported the outage?


3. Call our 24 hour Outage Reporting System at toll-free 1-877-272-1500 or (580) 272- 1500 (local Ada area).


4. Always report outages promptly! Remember, the cooperative's responsibility ends at the meter. If a service call is made and the trouble is found on the consumer's side, a $50.00 service charge will be assessed.


5. For faster service, please make sure we have the correct phone number(s) for your account on fi le. Your phone number will be used to access your account information.


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