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LIVEWIRE | PAGE 3 Honor Electrical Safety Month By Zac Perkins, Vice President-Corporate Services


Every May, we celebrate Electrical Safety Month. It’s a time when we place a spotlight on ways we keep you, our members, safe. This year, we’re focusing on how to keep safe after a storm


rolls through. No matter the type of weather or damage to electrical equipment and infrastructure, resulting safety hazards are generally the same. To stay safe after a major storm or natural disaster strikes,


ELECTRICAL SAFETY MONTH COLORING CONTEST FOR KIDS!


ENTER IN THREE EASY STEPS:


1. GET THE PAGE ONLINE AT WWW.TRI-COUNTYELECTRIC.COOP.


2. COLOR IT 3. RETURN IT BY MAY 31


A PRIZE VALUED AT $25 WILL BE AWARDED TO ONE WINNER IN EACH AGE GROUP.


htt p://w ww. tri- countyelectric.coop/ documents/fm_ coloringcontest2012.pdf





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Tri-County Electric urges you to develop a family action plan. Designate a place for everyone to meet after an event. Map out ways to evacuate your home. Create a laminated card with emergency contact names and numbers for each family member. Consider listing a relative or friend who lives far from your community as the point of contact—if your family gets separated, that person can let others know who is safe. And don’t forget pets in your family action plan—many rescue shelters will not accept pets after a catastrophe of some sort, so it’s


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May is National Electrical Safety Month. Enter our coloring contest!


Child’s Name: _________________________________ Parent(s) Name: _______________________________ Phone: _____—______—______


Age:  3 & Under  4-5  6-8  8 & Above A prize worth $25 will be awarded to one winner in each age group. Mail entries to Tri-County Electric, PO Box 880, Hooker, OK 73945 or drop off at 302 East Glaydas, Hooker, Okla.


ENTRY DEADLINE: May 31. Children of Tri-County Electric employees are not eligble to win, but are welcome to color! ®


important to decide beforehand where Fido or Tabby can take up residence for a while. It’s not hard to understand why safety remains a top priority for Tri-County Electric—working around electricity is a life-or- death situation every day for many of our employees. As a result, we work hard to instill a culture of safety that our folks can take home with them and live 24/7. We also strive to raise safety awareness among Tri-County Electric members. Look for safety tips in this LiveWire publication, and check www.tri-countyelectric.coop for more information. Pledge to honor Electrical Safety Month by fashioning an emergency action plan for your family today. Learn more about weathering storms safely at www.ready.gov.


Tornado Safety Tips Practice and Prepare


Know where you’ll meet your family during the tornado (and after). Practice a tornado drill annually. Keep a weather radio in your storm shelter, along with safety supplies.


Seek Shelter


Go to your basement, a small interior room, or under stairs on the lowest floor of the house. If you live in a mobile home, get out and look for a stable building. If outside, find low ground—away from trees and cars- and lie face down with your arms protecting your head.


After the Storm


Stay away from downed power lines, and avoid flooded areas— power lines could be submerged and still live with electricity. Don’t enter seriously damaged buildings and avoid using matches and lighters in case of gas leaks.


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Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Funnel, Inc.


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