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ElectraLite


As soon as babies learn how to crawl, they’re tempted to stick their fingers into electrical re- ceptacles and chew on extension cords. So the earlier they know how dangerous that is, the safer they’ll be growing up in a house full of electrical safety hazards. Teaching your children about electricity will help them stay safe around it, appreciate it and use it wisely as they grow. Here are five themes to convey—re- peatedly—as your kids mature:


MAY 2012 Never too early to teach kids about electricity Spring safety tips


1. Electricity is a wonderful tool that makes it possible for your home to have heat and air con- ditioning, for your refrigerator to keep your food cold and for their computers, TV and video games to work. 2. As much as electricity is a benefit, it can be harmful, too. Exploring the electrical compo- nents of a toy or appliance that’s plugged in can result in a shock, and sometimes those shocks are severe enough to burn or injure you. Playing with anything that plugs in can be dangerous if you’re rough or careless. 3. Water and electricity don’t mix. Dunking a plugged-in toy or other electrical device into water can shock or even kill a child. 4. Wasting electricity doesn’t make sense. Turning off lights when you leave a room and unplugging computers, video games and electrical toys when nobody’s using them is good for the planet and can save Mom and Dad some money on energy bills. 5. Your family is a member of a unique kind of electric utility—called an electric coopera-


tive. That means your family owns the utility that it buys its electricity from. Adults can vote in its leadership elections and can participate in the utility’s business by attending annual meetings. They can even run for a seat on the board.


Take care of frightened animals during storms


Many pets are frightened by thunder and lightening. They may get injured, run off, become lost, or cause damage as they seek to escape. 915375501


* Bring pets indoors before storms begin. * Make sure the pet has identification. Iden- tification tags on a well-fitting collar and/or a microchip.


* Set up a “safe” area in your house for your pet. This might be a crate or carrier in an inner


Vegetation control continued from 1


is a major expense for CVEC and, bottom line to you the consumer member because it is one of the main expenditures that your electric bills pay for.


CVEC spent over 2 million dollars last year on actual cutting and trimming and on herbi- cide treatment. To properly control the vegeta- tion in the ROW it requires both cutting and herbicide treatment. In a program that cuts only your regrowth will be at least twice as many trees because of stump sprouting. To control regrowth herbicide is needed to decrease your trees per mile and also it is more cost effective because vegetation on a little over 8 miles can be controlled with herbicide compared to 1 mile with cutting with the same amount of money.


Currently we have brought in Environ- mental Consultants, Inc. to evaluate our ROW program so we can maintain the ROW in the most efficient manner. ECI has over 35 years of vegetation management consulting experience in the electric utility industry and is an impar- tial, environmental, scientific, and vegetation management consulting firm. Long time Right-Of-Way Coordinator David Heaton is planning on retiring in June. He has spent a lot of time on the system evaluating the ROW and checking crews, he will be missed. Trees are beautiful and God created them with a purpose for beauty and converting carbon dioxide to oxygen but the bottom line is that trees and electric lines don’t mix.


room or basement. Closing the drapes or turn- ing up the radio or TV may help. * Remember water and food for your pets when you assemble your emergency supplies. * Take your pet’s mind off the storm. Play with them, feed them and reward them for their calm behavior. Praise your pet for calm behav- ior; never discipline them for being fearful or reward them when they are fearful. Reinforce the good.


As you spend more time work- ing in your yard this spring, use caution with electric tools and power lines. * Call your electric coopera- tive and your phone, gas and cable companies if you plan to dig in your yard. Whether you’re putting up a fence, planting trees or digging a foundation for an ad- dition to your home, you run the risk of hitting a buried utility line. Don’t guess. * Plant trees far away from


power lines. Use the 20/20 rule: If a tree is likely to grow to 20 feet tall by the time it matures, plant it at least 20 feet away from either side of a power line. Don’t guess; damaging utility equip- ment can leave you and your neighbors without service and could wind up costing you big bucks for repairs. * Avoid the utility lines you can see overhead. Hire a profes- sional to trim any trees that are within reach of an overhead elec- tric line. If the lines are close to your roof, call your electric coop- erative before climbing up there to work out a safety plan that might include temporarily killing the juice to the “live” wire. * Educate your children about the dangers of playing around electrical equipment. Forbid them from flying kites near overhead lines, from climb- ing utility poles or from hanging around nearby substations. * Assume every fallen power line is “live” and can kill you if you touch it. Stay far away—and keep your kids away. Call Cana- dian Valley Electric Cooperative immediately and report fallen power lines. * Before you use your corded


power tools this season, clean them and inspect them for cracks, frayed cords and damaged plugs.


Look in this month’s edition of the Electrlite for the hidden account number. Find yours and it’s worth $25. The number must be your own. Your number must be reported by the 15th of each month to our office by phone, mail or in person.


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