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Now Arriving! 2012 EDITION


Are you “narrow minded?” Don't miss out on on the only annual publication dedicated to “O” scale narrow gauge model railroading! The 2012 On30 Annual is packed with 116 pages of great features for both beginners and veteran modelers! Get on board!


40-foot swing-door steel reefer: HO scale Mfd. by Accurail Inc., P.O. Box 278, Elburn, IL 60119; www.Accurail.com The latest plastic injection-molded


kits available from Accurail represent 40-foot, swing-door, all-steel ice- bunker refrigerator cars built by Pacif- ic Car & Foundry in 1949 and 1950. Beginning in 1937 large numbers of 40-foot, all-steel refrigerator cars were built by numerous builders for private car fleets: WFE, FGE, BRE, MDT, etc. These had a bunker in each end to car- ry ice for cooling commodities such as fresh fruit, vegetables, and eggs. Some were also equipped with overhead rails for carrying beef. Over the years there have been plas-


Make tracks for


your local dealer or order direct!


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ALL NEW 2012 On30 ANNUAL


$16.95 PLUS S&H ORDER ITEM 028-7


CARSTENSBOOKSTORE.COM (888) 526-5365


Carstens PUBLICATIONS, INC. 82 APRIL 2012


tic freight car kits representing 40-foot, steel ice-bunker reefers from Inter- Mountain, Wm. K. Walthers, Athearn Trains, Model Power, Varney and Trix. This new Accurail kit most closely represents reefers built in 1949 and 1950 by Pacific Car & Foundry (PC&F) in Renton, Washington. PC&F built 250 for the Western Fruit Express Compa- ny, series WFEX 68400-68649. Western Fruit Express was a subsidiary of the Great Northern Railway and primarily provided refrigerated transport for shippers on the GN. PC&F also built 700 for the Fruit Growers Express Company, series FGEX 39300-39999, and 200 for the Burlington Refrigerator


Express Company, BREX 74200-74397. The basic dimensions were exterior


height, 15′-1″; exterior length, 42′-3″; external width, 9′-10″; inside width, 8′- 3″; and inside height, 7′-3″. They had a capacity of 100,000 lbs. and 1,987 cubic feet. These cars had straight side sills and swing doors with openings of 4′-0″ width and 6′-6″ or 7′-6″ height. They also had five riveted panels on each side of the door opening. The 3/3 Improved Dreadnaught ends


by Standard Railway Equipment Co. had a top rib with a straight bottom rather than the usual mirror image of the curved contour of its top. The Mur- phy solid steel roof had diagonal pan- els and overhanging eaves. The run- ning board was made of steel by Ajax. There were no platforms around the hatch covers. Polling pockets were on the end corners, and placard boards were initially mounted high on the sides to the left of the door. Most cars were equipped with a Universal or Ajax type power brakes. The cars were equipped internally


with floor racks to elevate the load above the floor and Preco fans at the floor level to circulate air under the floor racks beneath the load. The rated ice capacity was 10,600 lbs. of crushed ice, or 10,200 lbs. of coarse ice, or 9,600 lbs. of chunk ice. They were equipped with adjustable ice grates for stage ic- ing. When the grates were in position,


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