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Rix Compressed Air & Drill Co. of San Francisco offered its customers curious 0-4-0 CA’s with vertical cylinders, but their only major client was the Empire placer gold mine at Grass Valley, Calif. They were not suitable for use in underground mines since they had Primus kerosene reheaters. By far, the most popular builder of com-


pressed air locomotives was H.K. Porter of Pittsburgh, which began to dabble with pneumatics in 1890 when it built a double tank 0-4-0CA for W.H. Brown, the same company that had purchased Baldwin’s first mining pneumatic in 1883. After improving the design, Porter delivered another 0-4-0 CA of similar dimensions to Port Royal Coal & Coke and a few years later, a more refined single tank 0-4-0CA to Susquehanna Coal (both firms operated underground mines in Pennsylvania). By 1900, Porter was build- ing 0-4-0CA’s and 0-6-0CA’s in dozens of configurations. Porter’s air locomotives were simple,


rugged, and dependable, and the company marketed them to mines and industries around the country. Sizes ranged from tiny cabless four-wheel engines for use in mine tunnels to six-wheel monsters intended for heavy haulage. If clearances were especially tight, cylinders could be placed inside the lo- comotive frames and air tenders could be added to increase their range. As the years progressed, Porter engineers continued to refine the pneumatics, culminating in a rev- olutionary two-stage compound introduced in 1908 (more about this next month). One reason for Porter’s popularity was that it of- fered an entire air haulage package that in- cluded everything down to the pipelines and air compressors, which were supplied by Norwalk Iron Works and Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co. (later Ingersoll-Rand). A look through the construction records


reveals that many major U.S. mining com- panies purchased Porter pneumatics. Buy- ers included Peerless Coal & Coke (West Vir- ginia), Cambria Iron (Pennsylvania and Wyoming); U.S. Smelting & Refining (Utah), St. Joseph Lead (Missouri), Ray Consolidat- ed Copper (Arizona), Nevada Consolidated Copper (Nevada), H.C. Frick (Pennsylvania), and Homestake Mining (South Dakota). One of the largest fleets was owned by Anaconda Copper, with over a dozen double-tank air motors on its roster by 1905 which were used for surface haulage at the Anaconda, Mon- tana, reduction works. Ranging in weight from 13 to 21 tons, they operated at 800 p.s.i., had cabs, and sported Westinghouse air brakes. Anaconda was pleased with its air-powered tramway and continued to pur- chase new locomotives until 1914. Not to be overlooked are the air locomotives


Porter built for industrial use, most with full- sized cabs, sand domes, and bells. One major customer was International Harvester, which operated several 30″ gauge, 7¹/₂ ton 0-4-0CA’s at its McCormick Division lumber yards in Chicago. The U.S. Navy preferred Porter pneumatics for switching ammunition depots at Iona Island, N.Y., and Dover, N.J. Most of the single-stage pneumatic loco-


motives preserved in the U.S. are of Porter construction, the majority from Homestake Mining (more about these next month). The oldest, technically no longer an air loco, is C/N 1715, a one-time 18″ gauge 0-4-0CA built in 1896 for the Standard Mining Co. at Wallace, Ida. It was sold to Hecla Mining of Burke, Ida., in 1916 and used under ground


until 1935, when it was turned it into a side- tank steam locomotive for surface use. One end of the storage tank was removed and a firebox was added, along with tube sheets and flues. The front of the tank became the smokebox door and the track gauge was changed to 24″. In this configuration it oper- ated for many more years, first for Hecla and then for Sullivan Mining, before being preserved in 1951. Today it’s been restored to running condition and is privately owned in Washington State. Another early single-stage Porter is C/N


2085, a cabless six-ton 0-4-0CA built in 1899 for the Red Point Mine, a placer gold opera- tion near Foresthill, Calif. Its main tank holds 60 cubic feet of air and was pressur- ized to 800 p.s.i. It was retired in 1909 and was has been preserved at the Foresthill Di- vide Museum. Besides building for the domestic market,


Porter exported pneumatic locomotives to Japan, Austria, France, Chile, Spain, and the Dutch East Indies. In addition, Canadi- an mining companies imported dozens of air motors for use mostly in the West, and a handful of early Porter single-stage pneu- matics, have been preserved there. At the ghost town of Bankhead, Alberta, a


26″ gauge 0-4-0CA believed to have been built for the Canmore Coal Co. is exhibited with a string of coal hoppers among the ru- ins of the Bankhead mine, which was oper- ated by the Pacific Coal Co. from 1903-1922. The mine was owned by Canadian Pacific and supplied coal for CP locomotives; the site is now part of Banff National Park. An original 42″ gauge Bankhead 0-4-0CA


built in 1902 is on display at the Heritage Park Historical Village in Calgary, Alberta. The park also displays C/N 4476, a hefty 0-4-0CA built in 1909 for the Crow’s Nest Pass Coal Co. of Coal Creek, British Columbia. Elk River Collieries No. 4 is displayed at


the Chilliwack Heritage Park in Chilliwack, British Columbia. The 36″ gauge single- stage 0-4-0CA was built around 1905 for Crow’s Nest Pass Coal and worked there all its life. When the colliery closed in 1958 it went to an Alberta junk yard, where it was discovered in 1965 and “restored” with a phony wooden cab, cowcatcher, and a fake smokestack welded to the air reservoir. To- day the cab has been removed, although the fake stack remains. A similar Elk River Col- liery 0-4-0CA is exhibited at the 93&3 Dairy Bar near Elko, British Columbia. One of the nicest single-stage compressed


air locomotives in Canada can be found on display at the offices of Andrew Merrilees, Ltd., a used locomotive dealer and contrac- tor in Toronto. The six ton, 40¹/₂″ gauge 0-4-0 CA was built by Porter in May 1906 (C/N 3500) for Plymouth Cordage, which opened a second plant that year in Welland, On- tario. It shuffled materials over 1800 feet of trackage within the plant and had an air reservoir pressure of 800 p.s.i. (140 p.s.i. in the auxiliary reservoir). Because it was in- tended for above ground use, locomotive No. 1 was built with an enclosed oak cab, sand dome, and a full-size bell. In 1956 the rail- road was dismantled and the locomotive sold to Merrilees. Since then the company has done an extensive cosmetic restoration on the 0-4-0CA, which included the fabrica- tion of a replacement cab. Next Month: Porter two-stage compressed


air locomotives, and preserved air motors of the Homestake Mining Co.


R.V.Q.


RAILROAD VIDEO QUARTERLY R.V.Q. #77 (Fall 2011)


RAILROAD VIDEO QUARTERLY - ISSUE #77 Photo: George Gabritsch


Fall 2011 Two Hours “Cr ipple Effect”: Challenges to Regional Railroads The Big Engine that Almost Didn’t


TRAIN FESTIVAL 2011 and Nine more subjects. Photo: Steve Barry


1. In Honor: Vaughn “Doc” Smith; Alfred Coleman 2. “CRIPPLE EFFECT”: Wisconsin & Southern’s plea 3. PHOENIX and NORFOLK Light Rail 4. TRAIN FESTIVAL 2011 - Steam and Heat! 5. Slipping Mightily - 844’s crew perseveres 6. Isle of Man / Sardinia / Cuba visits; 1990s 7. Boston & Maine - 1950s - 1970s. 8. “Silver Streak” (1934) Highlights 9. 765 Steams in the Cuyahoga Valley 10. Erie-Lackawanna C425s over the Poconos 11. Kentucky outings of SOU 630 and other locos 12. Abo Canyon, washouts, other short items This issue is $29 Ppd, or SUBSCRIBE AT OUR NEW LOWER RATE OF $59 FOR ONE YEAR (4 Issues)! Check or M.O. to: RVQ - BOX 129 TALLMADGE, OH 44278


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Erie-Lackawanna Revisited E-L Legacy Update #2, October 2011


Erie-Lackawanna Revisited E-L Legacy Upate #2, October 2011


90 Minutes


Davidson, Jamestown Station, AC Tower, and rolling stock, operations on former E-L lines (Ashalnd Ry, NJ Transit, Steamtown...) A good companion to our popular 1996 E-L Legacy (2-DVD set), and Update #1 from 1999. 90 minutes. $29.00 postpaid SPECIAL: Get the entire E-L LEGACY set (4 DVDs) for just $69 Ppd.


MAIL by RAIL


An Inside Look at the Railway Post Office MAIL by RAIL


62 MINUTES An Inside Look at the RAILWAY POST OFFICE


1956 TRAINING FILM • ON THE SANTA FE CELEBRATE THE CENTURY • OWNEY


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JUNE 3-5, 2011: FEATHER RIVER CANYON - INSIDE GATEWAY - SHASTA ROUTE Photos: Chris Skow, Trains & Travel International


63 Minutes


NORTHERN CALIFORNIA EXPLORER NORTHERN CALIFORNIA EXPLORER


For 113 years, mail was sorted aboard trains. As recently as 1951, 93% of all long haul mail still went by rail. Program includes: TRAINING FILM ABOARD B&O, ON BOARD THE SANTA FE, FINAL RPO RUNS, OWNEY TRIBUTE,


#9 in Revelation’s ERIE- LACKAWANNA SERIES! Our first half showcases the E-L Years: 1960 transi- tion year in Denville and Hoboken, through the 60s. Then recent years: Last run of DL&W engineer Bill


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JUNE 3-5, 2011: FEATHER RIVER CANYON - INSIDE GATEWAY - SHASTA ROUTE. This was the first scheduled passenger train in over 50 years to ply the “Highline”(Inside Gateway). See the entire three day


THE RAILWAY POST OFFICE A I d L k


Art: Dean Martz


Courtesy Central Coast Railway Club


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