This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NOTE TO RULE 6-3 grants players an additional fi ve minutes to show up for their starting time without being disqualifi ed. The player still incurs a


▲ PROTECTION OF YOUNG TREES allows a player to drop his or her ball away from


a young tree under Rule 24-2 (Immovable Obstructions). This local rule is adopted to protect young trees from being damaged or killed by a player’s stroke. The trees protected by this local rule are most commonly identifi ed by stakes.


two-stroke penalty in stroke play that would apply to the fi rst hole or a loss of the fi rst hole in match play.


E-mail Ryan at rgregg@ncga.org


DISTANCE MEASURING DEVICES allows the committee to adopt the local rule that permits the players to measure distance only with an electronic device. If the device is capable of measuring any other condition (e.g., gradient, wind speed, temperature, etc.) regardless whether any such additional function is used, it would result in disqualifi cation.


AERATION


HOLES grants relief to a player whose ball has come to rest in an aera- tion hole through


the green or on the putting green. When the player’s ball lies in an aeration hole through the green, a player may drop the ball as near as possible to the spot where it lay but not nearer the hole. On the putting green, a ball may be placed at the nearest spot not nearer the hole that avoids the situation.


▲ OBSTRUCTIONS CLOSE TO THE PUTTING GREEN provides additional relief, without pen-


alty, from intervention on a player’s line of play. However, there are several qualifi ers that must be established prior to a player being granted relief. The ball must not lie in a hazard (including bunkers). The obstruction must be within two club-lengths of the putting green. The ball must be within two club-lengths of the obstruction. The obstruction must intervene on the player’s line of play.


FALL 2011 / NCGA.ORG / 63











Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76