This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
4


France. Located on a knoll surrounded by vineyards, the chateau offers sweep- ing views of vineyard-covered hills and is an ideal setting for post-round wine. The Castello di Amorosa is a new


3 Those with connections might


consider private courses such as Napa Valley CC, where the cart path on the 12th hole is modeled off San Francisco’s Lombard Street, Jack Nickalus’ sprawl- ing and panoramic Mayacama, where the wine connection runs so deep the members have personal wine lockers, the iconic Sonoma GC, situated on 177 acres of rolling terrain dotted with massive oaks, lakes and expansive views of the mountains and vineyards or the nine-hole Vineyard Knolls, located on a private estate in the Carneros region of Napa Valley. But you don’t come to one of the


true wine capitals of the world just to play golf. Vineyards are seemingly everywhere and the choices of where to visit and wine-taste are dizzying. An excellent starting point is Artesa, on the south end of the valley. Views of distant San Francisco and a striking sculpture garden make this a fun stop for non-drinkers as well. Nearby lies the Domaine Carneros château, a clas- sic 18th century castle inspired by the Château de la Marquetterie in Champagne,


1 Chardonnay Lakes 2 Napa Valley Wine Train 3 The pool at Auberge du Soleil


4 Grand Barrel room


addition to the Napa scene, and is an utterly unique facility resembling a Tuscan castle with the requisite cellars, dry moat and great halls where you can just imagine knights toasting their latest victory and even a church and torture chamber. The expansive castle also has wine-tasting in its basement, designed to look like a medieval dungeon. Approaching the castle from highway 29, you might think you are seeing a mirage (or maybe had a little too much at the last winery), but the attention to detail owner Dario Sattui (of the V. Sat- tui Winery) lavished on the property becomes immediately apparent. But wine-tasting in the area can


be experienced as simply as a stroll in town—either in the larger town of Napa, or the more quaint Yountville or St. Helena. Yountville is the site of the region’s first planted vines (1838) and is perhaps the image many conjure when they think of Napa. The town claims more Michelin-rated stars per capita than any place in the world due to its epicurean reputation burnished by chef extraordinaire Thomas Keller’s French Laundry, known as perhaps the finest restaurant in the country. While most cannot afford the nine-course tast- ing menu everyone can experience his brilliance at Bouchon Bakery (next to Bouchon Bistro) on Washington Street. Inspired by croissants, tarts and other


FALL 2011 / NCGA.ORG / 39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76