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Mesquite’s Secret is Out By Scott Seward H


Where to Play Big spenders can enjoy word-class layouts for $500 or more at SHADOW CREEK, CASCATA and WYNN GC. Far more affordable golf is abundant in the area; BALI HAI is an entertaining and


By now, Mesquite’s allure is no secret due to the growing eastern Nevada city’s superb golf that makes the 75-mile drive from Vegas well worth a trip.


Wolf Creek continues to awe golfers with its extreme setting, one of the most intimi- dating in the game. The hilly and circuitous routing debuted in 2000 and requires signing a waiver to rent a cart, but the trip produces one of golf’s most memorable rounds more akin to a roller coaster ride. For the first-time visitor, some of the carries and hazards look insurmountable, but if the cor- rect tees are chosen, the course plays easier than it looks. Conestoga GC opened in 2010 and is the


newest course in the area. As with all Mes- quite courses, the rocky landscape is used to prime effect. Dramatic water hazards and elevation change also characterize the layout,


which is open to residents of Sun City Mes- quite and via packages at the Eureka Casino and Resort.


A short drive away—though everything is


a short drive in the small town—lies Falcon Ridge, golf’s equivalent to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities.” A gentle outgoing nine is fol- lowed by a ferocious back that measure more than 500 yards longer and has some of the same visual intimidation as Wolf Creek. The two entertaining courses at the


playable option on the south end of the Strip in the shadow of Mandalay Bay. Palm trees, tropical plants and water features transport you from the heart of the desert. The LEGACY GOLF CLUB distinguishes itself even in the Las Vegas scene with its 10th tee box in the shape of a spade, club, diamond and heart and currently offers attractive stay-and-play packages. TPC LAS VEGAS and TPC SUMMERLIN are two options that have hosted the Champions and PGA Tour’s best.


Wolf Creek


500-room CasaBlanca Resort and Casino are the Palms, the first course in the region (1990) and CasaBlanca GC. The Palms is just across the Arizona border and has more than 200 of its namesake trees spread across the property along with some dramatic canyons to negotiate. CasaBlanca, located at the resort, will make you think you’ve been transported to Florida because of the relatively flat but water-hazard heavy routing (water is a factor on 13 holes). The air-conditioned carts are a plus in the summer, where deals can be had during the intense heat. The area’s only 36-hole facility,


Oasis GC, has two Arnold Palmer designs of different character. The Palmer course boasts deep canyons requiring drop shots to what appears like tiny green targets as well as numerous water hazards and bunkers. The less demanding Canyons course is shorter and is perfect for devel- oping players. The area has become well-known for


its value and Vegas-like experiences at a slower pace. But a more serene setting masks an aggressive spirit that has sparked the development of all of its golf courses in the last 21 years. All the area’s layouts exhibit rugged terrain boasting stark con- trasts of brown, green and sky blue and, given their proximity to Sin City, should be on any Vegas golf itinerary.


FALL 2011 / NCGA.ORG / 29


PHOTO: WOLF CREEK


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