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PHOTO: MILLER BROWN


PHOTO: JOANN DOST


Pebble Beach Golf Links Hole No. 18


frequent prevailing wind and a second shot from an uneven lie is trumped by an approach shot framed by three nasty greenside bunkers. “Treasure Island” is a fitting moniker for a hole head professional Jin Park simply calls “daunting.” The hole tumbles downhill and left, gradually revealing the ocean as if a curtain is being pulled back on the round. An opening test for


multiple tournaments in the course’s 45-year history, including the annual AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro- Am, the first hole proves a worthy beginning to a


five-hole stretch of stunning ocean views and unparalleled golf. The easily recognizable sounds of barking seals are your cue to keep the ball in play on this Robert Trent Jones Sr. masterpiece.


THE LINKS AT SPANISH BAY Hole No. 14, 576 yards The name “Wind &


Willow” provides a few not-so-subtle hints on this signature hole overlook- ing Spanish Bay. Playing closer to a par 6 on most days, the customary south- east wind makes every shot a challenge. Throw in the


marshland down the right side, well-placed bunkers and natural dunes, and you’ll swear you were teeing it up in the Scottish highlands. It helps that if you play the course at twilight, you’ll hear the resorts’ bagpiper, lending authenticity and a dash of chill bumps to your back nine. “It sets the stage to finish the course in true links-style golf,” head professional Rich Cosand says. “This hole requires both confidence and skill to navigate the natural hazards which border the undulating and rolling fairways.” Like many holes on this ocean- side course, par is a good score. Just ask World Golf Hall of Fame member and one of the course’s architects Tom Watson. His 5-under 67 inaugural round still stands as the official course record at Spanish Bay.


DEL MONTE GOLF COURSE Hole No. 9, 524 yards “A hole with a lot of


Del Monte Golf Course Hole No. 9


opportunity.” That’s how head professional Neil Allen describes the picturesque 9th at Del Monte Golf Course. Like many of the par 5s throughout Pebble Beach Resorts, this hole rewards long, well-placed drives with a reachable second shot. It also provides its fair share of risk for over- zealous players. “Over the green is trouble,” says Allen, referring to the treacherous come-back chip onto one of the many fickle, tiny greens at Del Monte. Indeed, many believe that the best preparation for a round at Pebble Beach is playing Del Monte, such are the simi- larities of the courses’ small and ticklish greens. Like its 17 consorts on


26 / NCGA.ORG / FALL 2011


the historic course, the 9th hole is steeped in tradition, lined tightly by Monterey pines and marked with the potential to finish your front with a birdie or to take the turn with a head- shaking bogey. For nearly 115 years, golfers at Del Monte have come to un- derstand the importance of offense versus defense. Play this one with confidence, but take your medicine on an errant drive.


NCGA WINTER STAY and PLAY PACKAGE


Two nights with FREE ROOM UPGRADE at: • The Lodge at Pebble Beach or The Inn at Spanish Bay


Two rounds of golf: • One round on Pebble Beach Golf Links


• One round on Spyglass Hill Golf Course or The Links at Spanish Bay


Reserve your package today. Call for details at 800/877-0356 and ask for “NCGA3”


Offer valid November 20, 2011 through March 31, 2012, and is subject to availability. Valid for new bookings only, parties of eight rooms or less and not valid in conjunction with any other offers. Please visit www.PebbleBeach.com for more details.


Advertorial


Pebble Beach®, Pebble Beach Resorts®, Pebble Beach Golf Links®, The Lodge at Pebble Beach™, Spanish Bay®, The Links at Spanish Bay™, The Inn at Spanish Bay™, Spyglass Hill® Golf Course, Del Monte™ Golf Course and the course images and individual hole designs are trademarks, service marks and trade dress of Pebble Beach Company. All rights reserved.


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