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Shag Bag


NCGA MEMBER NIGHTS The Golf Mart will host a series


of NCGA Member Appreciation Nights at two locations throughout Northern California.


The nights will offer special discounts, raffl es and give- aways to NCGA members and serve to introduce the shops as portals to NCGA membership (each store


hosts an NCGA Associate Club). NCGA members already enjoy a 10% discount on shoes, bags (excluding Ping) and apparel at all Golf Mart and Roger Dunn Golf Shops in Northern California.


NCGA MEMBER NIGHTS SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 5-8 P.M. SEASIDE: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 5-8 P.M.


Perry uses Obama’s penchant for golf to raise money for his campaign


Spending time on the golf course is something many people look forward to, especially after a long day or week at work. This is rarely looked at as an im- proper way to spend leisurely time, unless you’re the Leader of the Free World.


As the 2012 presidential


campaigns start to heat up, GOP candidate RICK PERRY came up with a unique way to raise money for his run at the White House. Perry spotlighted Presi- dent Obama’s penchant for golf by encourag- ing potential donors to pledge $76 to his campaign. Seventy- six is not to honor Obama’s best round of golf—that is not on record—it’s the alleged number of rounds Obama has played since taking offi ce. According to ABC News,


the following excerpts came from Perry’s campaign man- ager Rob Johnson in an e-mail to potential contributors: “In honor of his prodigious golf habit, I ask you to donate $76 today—a dollar for each round


of golf Obama has played since becoming president. “Thirty-one months, 12 days


and 76 rounds of golf later, we still await the president’s plan to create jobs...Now the president wants a mulligan.” While 76 rounds in less


than three years is signifi - cant, Obama falls quite a bit short of the pace set by other past presidents— Woodrow Wilson played more than 1,000 and Dwight Eisenhower played more than 800 dur- ing their respective eight-year terms. Even though 15 of the last 18 U.S. Presidents have


played, many have shied away publicly from declaring their


devotion. Legend has it that John F. Kennedy implored his ball to stop short of a hole-in-one at Cypress


Point only months before the election in 1960 because of the press that would have come with the improbable shot.


King and Mouse Join Forces ARNOLD PALMER GOLF MANAGEMENT now operates and manages Walt Disney


World Resort’s fi ve courses in Orlando, Florida. The fi ve courses—Palm, Mag- nolia, Lake Buena Vista, Osprey Ridge and Oak Trail—bring the total company operations to more than 70.


The 20-year partnership brings with it Palmer-lead renovations to the Palm Course (giv-


ing Palmer the design credit), greatly enhancing Disney’s design lineage that previously included Tom Fazio (Osprey Ridge). “After 40 years as a golf course architect, I’m look- ing forward to this opportunity to contribute to Disney’s rich and storied golf legacy,”


the Pebble Beach co-owner and seven-time major winner said. “I’ve enjoyed a lifetime of memories playing


golf and it will be a great reward to pass that on to those who share a passion both for Disney and the game of golf.” The Palm and Magnolia Courses are longtime hosts of the PGA Tour’s Children’s Miracle Network Classic in mid-October.


14 / NCGA.ORG / FALL 2011


PHOTO: DREAMSTIME


PHOTO: AP IMAGE


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