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CL AS S NO TE S


Brie O’Malley is interim recruitment director at City Year New York, an Ameri - corps program that places 17- to 24-year- olds in 10 months of school-based volun- teer service. She is also pursuing a mas- ter’s in public administration at Baruch College. Since graduation, her career path meandered through the ski industry, tech- nology, and event production before she found her niche in the nonprofit sector. Brie and her husband live in Astoria. Meghan McGurk Quintanilla lives in Connecticut with her husband, Victor, and continues to practice at Yale Univer - sity as a physician assistant in surgical oncology. She specializes in the treatment of breast cancer patients. ESTHER GOLDSCHLAGER 100 JOHN STREET, APT. 1910 NEW YORK, NY 10038 ESTHER.GOLDSCHLAGER@GMAIL.COM


’01 ’02


My husband, Andrew, and I


welcomed son Carter on May 6. JANINE GELLER JONES 7 GEORGE STREET STONEHAM, MA 02180 JRGELLER@HOTMAIL.COM


both maker and destroyer.” The perform- ance was funded by the National Foundation for the Arts. JACQUELINE VERNARELLI 42 IMRIE ROAD ALLSTON, MA 02134-2452 JVERNARELLI@GMAIL.COM


’05


Faith Towers is an active blogger at http://designfixation.blogspot .com, discussing art, photography, home decor, graphic design, and more. KRISTEN COATES 12 NORTH BRANCH RD. NEWTOWN, CT 06470 KRISTENCOATES83@GMAIL.COM and JASON DEL POZZO 110 SHELDON STREET PROVIDENCE, RI 02906 JDELPOZ@GMAIL.COM


’06 JUNE 2–5


Bettina Thomsen is a forensic social worker in the children’s rights division of Brooklyn’s Legal Aid Society. She was a panelist for “Careers That Make a Difference 101,” an April event sponsored by Skidmore’s Career Services. KATE NEDELMAN HERBST 35 HOLLINGSWORTH AVE. BRAINTREE, MA 02184 781-843-5140 KATEHERBST@GMAIL.COM


’03


Hilary Chernin is an assistant dis- trict attorney in Bronx County, prosecuting misdemeanor crimes includ- ing assault, DUI, trespassing, menacing, harassment, stalking, and weapons posses- sion. ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


In April, UWW grad Cara Ben - son performed a series of inter- connected poems from her new book, (made), at the Arts Center of the Capital Region in Troy, NY. A critic observes, “Through breath, repetition, and trance chant Benson embodies a sociopolitical process of presenting the performer as


’04


Adam Branfman lives in Newton


Highlands, MA, and is a sales and marketing as - sociate at Pure Encap - sulations, a hypoaller- genic nutritional supple- ment company based in Sud bury. He cycles in the Pan-Massachu - setts Challenge, which benefits the Jimmy Fund at the Dana Farber Can cer Institute, and is heavily involved with biking in many ways: recreationally, competitively, and as his primary mode of transporta- tion.


JUNE 2–5


Katie Largo is assistant counsel with the Defense Logistics Agency of the Defense Supply Center in Richmond, VA, where she practices labor and employment law. Ben Snydacker completed the MBA pro- gram at Boston University in May. He and Caitlin Bannon are engaged. Marc Miller graduated from UConn School of Law in 2009 and was admitted to the Connecticut Bar last fall. He lives in Hartford and is clerking for a year with the Connecticut judiciary. Jerome Mopsick lives in Saratoga Springs, where he enjoys the summer racing season. He is working hard on a new business start-up. This year UWW grad Maria Pflegl com- pleted teacher certification, a master’s degree, and a year of teaching full-time in the vocal music department for the Clif - ton Park, NY, school district—all the while completing her 20th year of teach- ing voice. She regularly performs with the Italian Serenaders and performed onstage with the Not So Common Players in God - spell. She was also the mother of the bride


AT WORK Saratoga’s past L


auren Roberts ’04 has found her future in the past. A lover of history and stories, she


has crafted a single career arc by following her interest in local history. As Saratoga County (N.Y.) historian, Roberts is charged with keeping the county’s records and assisting residents with in - quiries, including genealogy questions and house histories. (Just think of all the historic houses in Saratoga Springs itself.) She also speaks to near- by historical societies and writes articles for area newspapers. Roberts says she’s always been intrigued by local history. Still, she remembers the particular project at Skidmore, an assignment for a World War II history class, that sharpened her interest. “I wrote a paper about my grandfather who, along with his four brothers, served in the war.” To research the paper, she took oral histories from the two surviving veterans, as well as their spouses and several children. “It was really intense—particularly the things they dealt with when they came home.” But Roberts had little idea of how she could


combine her passion with paying work until she interned at the Saratoga Springs History Museum housed in Congress Park's Canfield Casino. The internship opened her eyes to the fact that, as she says, “there were jobs like this.” After graduation, she earned a master’s in public history at the State University of New York at Albany, worked for an archeology firm, and served as historian for the Town of Day in rural northwestern Saratoga County. Roberts has held the county position for a year


now. After familiarizing herself with the vast holdings of the office, she’s working to make records more user-friendly and find ways to reach a broader audience. She also may work oral histories into the mix. “A lot of people come in and tell me their stories,” Roberts says. “I write it all down.” —Jill Adams


FALL 2010 SCOPE 55


CREATIVE THOUGHT


CHARLIE SAMUELS


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