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“CTBP” BY THE NUMBERS


QUIRKS QUIZ


$271M Skidmore endowment in May 2010 (despite 20% loss in 2007–09 crash) $216.5M campaign total $200M campaign goal $150M Skidmore endowment in 2004 $78M total bequests and other planned gifts $32M financial aid budget in 2010 (vs. $16M in 2004) $38.6M annual-fund total $35M annual-fund goal $26.3M foundation/corporate gifts total $20M 2010 total giving (vs. $12M in 2004) $4.2M total raised by employee donors $1.3M raised from parents in 2010 16,753 total number of alumni donors 11,215 donors in 2009–10 10,000 goal for donors in 2009–10 8,054 miles away from campus of the farthest-flung donor 3,640 gifts made online in 2010 (vs. 566 in 2004) 2,647 total Friends of the Presidents donors* 2,000 new alumni donors to annual fund in 2009–10 505 gifts of $25,000 or more (vs. 81 in previous campaign) 240 endowed scholarships aiding students in 2010 150 new volunteers enlisted 76 percentage of employees who donated 61 percentage of alumni who donated 27 gifts of $1–5 million 6 gifts of $5–25 million


1.9 percentage of tuition increase in 201 (the lowest in 40 years) *$2,000 or more per year, with sliding scale of lower amounts for younger alumni classes


• three endowed faculty chairs: Tisch Family Distinguished Profes- sorship, Tang Chair in Chinese Studies, and Williamson Chair in Neuroscience (given by the sons of Billie Tisch ’48, by Oscar Tang, and by Susan Williamson ’59)


• four five-year-term faculty chairs (provided by the classes of 1961, ’62, ’64, and ’67 in honor of their reunions)


• new services and a dedicated coordinator for students with dis- abilities (a gift of Steve and Maribelle Leavitt, parents of Jona - than ’06)


• new alcohol and drug education and intervention programs (from an endowment established by Judy Lyman Shipley ’57 and husband Walter)


• annual residencies by distinguished Greenberg Middle East Scholars (supported by Jane Greenberg ’81)


• the newly renovated dining hall including the Kisiel Atrium and Emily’s Garden vegetarian station (funded by Polly Skogsberg Kisiel ’62 and husband Mark, and by Donald Sussman, father of Emily ’04)


• Wachenheim Field stadium, track, and long-turf soccer and lacrosse surface (given by Ed and Sue Wachenheim, parents of Lance ’85, Kim ’88, and Amy ’01)


g FALL 20 10 SCOPE 19


AUGUST “If my father could see Skidmore today, he would be truly thrilled, as we all are.” —John Moore (son of Skidmore Pres. Henry Moore) with Bettina Towne Moore ’41, donors to Moore Commons in the North- woods Village housing complex


AUGUST “Ambassadors ... to help drive future institutional decisions and make a real difference for Skidmore...” —Philip Glotzbach, describing alumni serving in the new Council of 100


PHIL GLOTZBACH


AUGUST “The food tastes better. It’s fresh, fantastic. A big step up.” —Tyler Vukmer ’07, about the transformed Murray-Aikins Dining Hall, including Emily’s Garden given by Donald Sussman, P’04


AUGUST “...a significant com- mitment ... to our athletic pro- gram. We all take great pride in representing Skidmore.” —Nick Coppola ’09, lacrosse captain, citing new playing fields funded by Ed and Sue Wachenheim and other par- ents and alumni


OCTOBER “...the gift opened so many doors for us—it’s the backbone of our alcohol and drug prevention program.” —Jen Burden, director of health promotions, regarding a $500,000 endowment from Judy Lyman Shipley ’57 and husband Walter


NOVEMBER “Tonight we want to remember the legacy that has shaped Skidmore’s past and present and to reaffirm our commit- ment to extending it into the future.” —John Howley ’80, an- nouncing the campaign’s formal, official launch with $121 million already raised


$121,000,000 2007


MAY “For the next 40 years, the College can grow in a manner that enhances the quality of the campus.” —Mike West, VP for finance and administration, on the new master campus plan


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