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CL AS S NO TE S CREATIVE THOUGHT Women’s vital voices R


oberta Krensky Cooper ’66 says her children tease her about it, but she has always want-


ed to make the world a better place. “They’ll say, ‘Mom’s saving the world again.’” Each of her careers has been in the nonprofit sector, with posts as varied as the now-defunct American Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford, Conn., and People for the American Way, an advocacy group for a wide variety of liberal causes. Now as busy as she’s ever been, the political and public-affairs consultant is most excited about her work with Vital Voices Global Partnership, an international nonprofit and nonpartisan organization that supports global women’s leadership. Cooper serves on its Connec - ticut steering committee, helping to raise money and publicize the cause of em - powering wo men throughout the world. Earlier this year, the Connecticut Council


brought African activist and artisan Rebecca Lolo - soli to Westport to speak. Twenty years ago, in her native Kenya, Lolosoli formed Umoja (“unity”), which provides a safe haven for abused women and training to promote human rights, economic empowerment, and the preservation of indigenous art and crafts. “The focus on women really touches people,” Cooper says. “We can’t lose half the popu- lation of the world—those women who are held back by their cultures.” In another Vital Voices project, seven women playwrights, including Anna Deavere Smith, were teamed with seven women human-rights leaders in their home countries, including Afghanistan, Nor - thern Ireland, Pakistan, and Guatemala. Together, they’ve woven the stories into a documentary the- ater piece called Seven, which has toured the US and Europe.


An English major at Skidmore, Cooper minored


in government and studied theater history, thereby discovering two moorings that would guide much of her life’s work. “Skidmore opened both of those worlds to me,” she says. —Jill Adams


pick up where we left off. She celebrated Reunion too for her dear Skidmore moth- er, Virginia Daniels Wall ’38, who passed away last year. Eileen Kirwin Cameron also has never missed a reunion and always enjoys Skid - more’s hospitality. Anne Woodruff moved east for the first time in 40 years, which made it easier to attend Reunion.


Judi Sambrook Bunker and Roger have already marked their calendars for our 50th.


Nancy Thielking Riseley, who gradu - ated from Albany Law School, is still prac- ticing after 42 years. She is a former assis- tant district attorney and town judge. This was her first time to Reunion; she promises to come back next time! Still active in real estate, Leslie Atkin - son Thomas is a VP with Coldwell Banker in Westford, MA.


Maxine Silton Goldberg is a VP with Prudential Fox Roach in Bala Cynwyd, PA. She attended Reunion with husband Jay, along with Sarah Martin-Munley and husband John. Sarah is a consultant in the pharmaceutical biotech industry. Pamela Page Traver’s etching Mt. Wash - ington Winter was shown at the alumni art exhibition. In May Carole Walter Maeder and fi - ancé Zack Murphy circumnavigated Ice - land; fortunately the volcano calmed down and they were able to see orca and humpback whales. She is already eager for our 50th.


Charlene Petnick Rosen was unable to attend Reunion because she and husband Dan were at his 50th at Dartmouth. They agreed they would attend her 50th in five years. She is still running their store, Mr. Charles, in State College, PA, and living in NYC, which provides a great balance. Her children live in NYC. Daughter Sari and Charlene buy for the store, son Ned is a photographer, and Aya is an artist and graphic designer. Varian Ayers and husband eat out in France and NYC (where they spend a lot of time) and elsewhere around the world. They have a blog called Country Epicure, in which they review restaurants and hotels they have visited in their travels: http://countryepicure.squarespace.com. TOBY WEISBERG RUBENSTEIN 315 SHERINGHAM DRIVE HOCKESSIN, DE 19707 302- 559-7501 FAX: 302-239-5618 OWCPCLAIMSCONSULTING@GMAIL.COM


’66


Now retired, Jean Eichorn Young -


quist enjoys being a court-appointed special advocate for a 12-year- old child, sitting on the board of the Poppy Reserve Mojave Desert Interpretive Association


JUNE 2–5


and guiding visitors through the spring displays of wildflowers, working on the production of a PBS episode of Wild Gardens, and writing grant applications for her favorite nonprofits. She and her husband also enjoy taking off on travel- ing adventures. Betsey Wattenberg Selkowitz has a home in Stamford, CT, and an apartment in NYC. Husband Arty is retired from the advertising business, and they enjoy trav- eling as well as many community activi- ties and charities. Son Jed lives in Atlanta, where he is director of entertainment marketing at Coca Cola. Son Adam is an independent film producer in Los Ange - les. In May he was married to Laurie Henderson, a recent Pepperdine Law School grad. At the wedding were Joan Paley Abramson, Steffi Evans Alexan - der, Susan Berman Bell, Dale Koslow Berger, Joan Cottler, Carole Wolf Fried - ler, and Ellen Chapin Schwartz. Neena Beber Bixby, who was traveling in Los Angeles, joined a small group of alumni for dinner. In March Gail Greenleaf Hencken had a fabulous time on the Holland America cruise ship Zuiderdam with her son and daughter-in-law and their three children. They cruised through the Gatun Locks to Gatun Lake and back, learning about the Panama Canal. She is now dreaming about where she will go with her daugh- ter and her family. Sharon Walker Boyd donated a sculp- ture of Lena Spencer to Caffè Lena, Sara - toga’s famed folk-music venue, in honor of its 50th anniversary last month. As a student (and early devotee of Caffè Lena) in 1965, she had created a plaster likeness of Spencer, which used to sit on the café’s piano. She recently cast it in bronze, had it mounted on a marble base, and for - mally donated it to the coffeehouse. Roselle Kline Chartock is celebrating the publication of her third book, Strat - egies and Lessons for Culturally Responsive Teaching. She and husband Alan are also celebrating daughter Sarah’s award for best dissertation from the Political Science Association. Son Jonas was elected to the board of the National Association for Charter School Authorizers.


42 SCOPE FALL 2010


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