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• Ahearn Training Room in the Sports Center (given by Dale Con- ron Ahearn ’75 and husband Dick, parents of Matthew ’02)


• new Athletics Hall of Fame (funded by Lee Peyser ’81) • an additional trainer, three part-time coaching positions ex- panded to full-time, plus support for team travel, sports gear, and other athletics and fitness needs (funded through Friends of Skidmore Athletics and other donations)


• library support marked by the naming of the Harris Lobby and the Winter Suite of art history offices (from Irving and Selma Harris, parents of Jonathan ’76 and Lisa ’80, and from Eleanor Linder Winter ’43 and family, including grandson Jonathan ’07)


• the first three years of a campus sustainability coordinator (from an Educational Foundation of America grant) The scholarship gifts alone demonstrate the life-changing power of campaign donors individually and in concert. A pro- gram funded in 2006 by Susan Williamson ’59 and the Kettering Fund has already prompted nearly 100 inquiries from prospective applicants with strong potential who might otherwise be ex- cluded from higher education because of past academic and eco- nomic disadvantages. One of the first to enroll was Chantrice Ollie ’10, who has written that the Kettering-funded scholarship gave her a “chance to prove, as a student having attended an urban school, that I have the ability to take on the rigorous and unique curriculum offered here at Skidmore.” She appreciates the scholarship aid for “making one of my major dreams come true … and for supporting my goals and future.”


Scholarship students, like athletes and Honors Forum mem- bers and opportunity-program enrollees, often help energize the entire student body with their special motivation and commit- ment to the college experience. The Davis United World College program for outstanding international students has brought eager and experienced learners from China, Guyana, Iraq, Po - land, and scores of other countries. Mugi Ayurzana ’09, from Mongolia, had both a Filene Music Scholarship and Davis UWC backing, through which, she says, “I have accomplished, aca - demically and personally, more than what I imagined I could do.” Just being awarded aid was a strong motivator; she cites not only the generous and crucial support but the gesture of Skid- more’s “unfading faith in me.”


No wonder ensuring access and affordability is a key institu- tional goal for the future. Beth Post-Lundquist, Skidmore’s direc- tor of financial aid, says, “As college costs rise and the working world changes rapidly, more students and their families are seek- ing to invest, and hoping we can help them to invest, in the in- terdisciplinary, creative, whole-person education that Skidmore provides.”


INTANGIBLE TRANSFORMATIONS Facilities and salaries and scholarships can directly affect the learning experience of students. The less monetary aspects of a comprehensive campaign can influence long-term relationships and culture, which can also benefit students directly as well as setting the stage for even more fruitful communal efforts down the road. After all, as Glotzbach has said, “At the heart of the Skidmore community we find values and relationships, not trans-


$134,000,000


SEPTEMBER “I want to raise aware- ness of how scientists develop these compounds and how powerfully and profoundly they affect our lives.” —Ray Giguere, professor of chem- istry and co-curator of Molecules That Matterexhibit supported by the Chemical Heritage Foundation and Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foun - dation


OCTOBER “It’s important that I support Skidmore and give somebody else an opportunity to have the same experi- ence that I did.” —Gene Freidman ’92, of his scholarship especially for first- generation students of Eastern Euro- pean descent


2008


MAY “We expect big things from you!” —Martin Zankel, presenting an additional $4.5M at the steel- raising ceremony for the Arthur Zankel Music Center


MARTIN ZANKEL


MAY “We asked, and you responded. I am so proud of our collec- tive efforts.” —Susan Gottlieb Beckerman ’67, alumni board VP for annual giving, announcing a record-high annual fund, totaling $6,413,977 for 2007–08


SEPTEMBER “I’ve been talking about the program all year long to ... people who want to adopt something similar in their schools ... that will make these young students think about how they fit into the grand scheme of things.” —musician Terence Blanchard, of his work with First-Year Experience and other students, thanks to the McCor- mack Artist-Scholar residencies en- dowed by trustee Charles Buchanan and wife Charlotte plus other donors


OCTOBER “Now, more than ever, it is important to show support for those institutions that make a difference in the world.” —Donald Sussman, P’04, of his $12M lead gift for new student housing to replace Scribner Village


$176,000,000


FALL 2010 SCOPE 21


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