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Ten alumni honored


At Reunion 2010, the alumni board celebrated these outstanding graduates:


Distinguished Achievement Award Nelle Nugent ’60 is one of the top inde- pendent Broadway producers of our time. As she recalls, “It was extremely rare in 1960 for a woman to be a stage manager.” But she worked her way up through summer stock and Off-Broad- way. As an executive at Theatre Now, she produced touring editions of hit musicals such as Fiddler on the Roof and Cabaret. By 1976, she and a partner launched McCann & Nugent Produc- tions, the most successful female part- nership in Broadway history, producing scores of award-winning hits. Nugent also teaches a postgraduate course in the business of film at New York University. At the awards ceremony, Nugent cred- ited influential Skidmore professors Car- olyn Anderson in theater, Phyllis Roth in English, James Kettlewell in art his- tory, and even the “miraculous and terri-


fying” Miriam Benkovitz, “who taught me how to read plays.”


Creative Thought Matters Award Noted entrepreneur Sharon Pfau White- ley ’70 has a knack for recognizing emerging markets. Her Whiteley- Works, a con- sumer insight and product-develop- ment company focused on aging midlife audiences,


“I’LL NEVER FORGET THE


ing in early-stage enterprises, she is co- author of the book The Old Girls’ Net- work: Insider Advice for Women Building Businesses in a Man’s World. She called Skidmore “a foundational and formative experience” that sparked her interest in women’s enterprise.


PROFESSORS WHO SERVED AS MENTORS AND THE CLASSMATES WHO TAUGHT ME THAT I COULD TAKE MY WORK SERIOUSLY, BUT I SHOULD NEVER TAKE MYSELF TOO SERIOUSLY.”


is widely regarded as a pioneer in strate- gic life-stage marketing. Founding Pea- cock Papers stationery featuring “posi- tive aging” messages, she ended up as chief creative officer of a $50 million gifts business. She was also CEO of an e-recruiting firm that matches college grads with employers and an online media company helping marketers en- gage with midlife consumers. A found- ing partner of 8Wings Ventures, invest-


Palamountain Award for Young Alumni Achievement Widely honored at- torney Jeremiah Frei-


Pearson ’00 works to fix broken foster- care systems and provide legal services for the young, poor, mentally ill, and in- carcerated. A psychology major with a minor in law and society, he interned at a local psychiatric hospital, helped lawyers seeking clemency for a death- row prisoner, and worked with US Sena- tor Ted Kennedy on health-care issues. After earning his JD at Stanford, he was hired by the firm of John Howley ’80 and was honored for his pro bono work. In 2006 he joined Children’s Rights, helping reform foster care from New Jer- sey to Oklahoma. He’s also active in local community groups tackling issues from unfair utility bills to marriage in- equality to hate crimes. He’s now run- ning for a seat in the New York State Legislature. He told the Reunion crowd, “I’ll never forget the Skidmore professors who served as mentors and the class- mates who taught me that I could take my work seriously, but I should never take myself too seriously.”


Porter Award for Young Alumni Volunteerism


CERAMIC GIFTS, CREATED BY PROF. REGIS BRODIE, AWAIT THE ALUMNI AWARDEES.


Craig Hyland ’05 has always been an ad- vocate and organizer for social justice. A particularly active leader of Skidmore’s Pride Alliance, he also founded Skid- more’s LGBT Alumni Association. He has served as class agent, president, secre- tary, and reunion chair, among other roles. Citing Skidmore’s strong educa-


30 SCOPE FALL 2010


PHIL SCALIA


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