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Six faculty veterans retire


Do the math and you come up with 146 as the combined years of service for this year’s faculty retirees. They’ve men- tored freshmen, advised senior projects, and taught many thousands of Skidmore students in hundreds of courses and per- sonal consultations. Phyllis Roth came to Skid- more from Northeastern Uni- versity in 1976. Her research and teaching specialties in- cluded Nabokov, Austen, and Bram Stoker. She was dean of the faculty between 1990 and 2000, with a stint as acting president in 1993. She espe- cially relished the growth of Skidmore’s distinctive collabo- rative-research programs. Along with participating in such sum- mer collaborations, she super- vised academic-year students in creating library exhibits for her Austen seminars and for a Dracula retrospective. She has described herself over the years as “delightedly shifting, being transformed by the broadening opportunities and challenges at Skidmore.”


Skidmore faculty in 1983. A specialist in superconductivity, he taught advanced courses in electricity and magnetism and also enjoyed teaching liberal studies courses on the social and environmental aspects of nuclear technology. He was a key advisor to students interested in Skid-


PHYLLIS ROTH SUE BENDER


Sue Bender started at Skid- more in 1980, while finishing her PhD at SUNY-Albany on prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Tetons. She has a long list of publications on her archae - ology, some of it conducted with students in South Park, Colo., in Saratoga’s High Rock Park, and elsewhere. She served as associate dean of the faculty in 1998–2002. And she co- curated the Tang Museum’s in- terdisciplinary exhibition Map- ping Art and Science, which she cites as just one of the valued opportuni- ties that “grew out of collaborations with colleagues.” She has said, “My career has been full of work I never would have done had I been elsewhere, and never would have imagined.” Physicist Bill Standish taught at SUNY- Albany for five years before joining the


14 SCOPE FALL 2010 BILL STANDISH MARY CORREA SUE VAN HOOK ROB LINROTHE


more’s joint engineering programs with other colleges, and he served as his depart- ment’s radiation-safety officer since 1984. Before Skidmore, Mary Correa, a grad-


uate of Yale School of Nursing and Purdue University’s business school, taught and worked in several hospitals. Then as a consultant and trainer, she helped organi-


zations to implement social- and health- policy initiatives and consulted for a major study of Illinois’s child and family services. She came to Skidmore’s business department in 1991, teaching organiza- tional theory and behavior, leadership dynamics, and various liberal studies courses. She has published pa- pers on bureaucracies, inter- group conflict, and human- services management, among other topics. Sue Van Hook managed the Nature Conservancy’s Lanphere- Christensen Dunes Preserve in California, where she studied mushrooms and other fungi and taught a range of audiences about the dune ecosystem. She was later director of land conser- vation and stewardship for the Maine Coast Heritage Trust. She started at Skidmore in 1992, teaching lab sections of biology courses and advising student re- search, especially in mycology. She also edited a book on Skid- more’s North Woods, created its Spirit in Nature meditation path in response to 9/11, and was an active leader of the Campus En- vironment Committee. Rob Linrothe, with a PhD from the University of Chicago, arrived at Skidmore in 1992. An expert on Asian art history, he spent many a summer studying remote temple murals and other art. Linrothe is the author of Ruthless Compassion: Wrathful Deities in Early Indo-Tibetan Eso- teric Buddhist Art and co-editor of Demonic Divine: Himalayan Art and Beyond. During a leave from teaching in 2002–04, he served as curator of Himalayan art at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and in 2008 he received a fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Full citations honoring these retirees are on the “Scopedish” blog. More profes- sors are set to retire soon; Scope will cover them next time. —SR


ISABELLE VAN HOOK


PHIL SCALIA


PHIL SCALIA


COURTESY OF ROB LINROTHE


ANDY CAMP


JOE VERICKER


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