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CL AS S NO TE S


Bill is keeping her busy in his retirement. Richard Schneider recently spoke at the Revolutionary Ideas in Biocommunica - tions Conference in Boston. He discussed panoramic photos by the US Geological Survey that were shot in Alaska from 1911 to 1932 and are now at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, MD, where Richard is a preservation-programs analyst. He also gave a talk on his own panoramic photos shot since 2008—check out his Facebook page.


Susanne Littleton Fournier went to Reunion with Kim Greene ’80. She ab - solutely loved connecting back with Skidmore and seeing Dana Alexander Dowie ’80, Cindy Snowman McGrath ’80,and Kyle Conrad. She missed our reunion last year to care for her elderly father, and attending this year made her feel much better. She adds that talking to older alumni made her realize the Skid - more spirit lives on. Debbie Topkin Fishkin’s daughter grad- uated from Connecticut College, and her son finished his junior year at Quinni - piac. Debbie traveled to the Galápagos Islands and has plans to visit Croatia. She lives in Marblehead, MA, and would love to meet up with anyone in the area. Elisabeth Agnew Thomson and hus- band Bruce have three children, the youngest of whom attends Villanova Uni - versity. Their other two sons have gradu- ated from college and live near Elizabeth in Washington Township, NJ. Karen Scoles was sorry to miss our 30th reunion but is looking forward to campus visits with daughter Lizzi, who is in high school.


I was recently in Dallas and spent time


with Alec Neville ’78. This past spring I participated in my second MB107 class at Skidmore. I am still amazed how incredi- bly poised and smart today’s students are—and most of them in MB107 were freshmen! I urge you all to get involved with Skidmore in some way. I also took off to Italy for 10 days to hike, eat, and shop—not necessary in that order! DEBBIE MONOSSON 16 PERRY STREET CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139-3912 DEBBIE@BFEC.COM


’80


Joanne Skudder moved to Fal - mouth, MA, on Cape Cod.


Linda Jewett’s daughter is a junior En - glish-education major at Ithaca College. John Howley regretted missing Re - union. He and his wife were on the Skid - more campus about a week before to


watch son Thomas ’10 graduate—he had a wonderful four years. John says it was different and better in some ways than our time at Skidmore, but the core values of community, close student relationships with wonderful faculty members, and interdisciplinary liberal education, plus great arts programs (and never forgetting to have fun) remain the same. In 2006 yoga therapist Dee Marie (for- merly Denise Wyshak), created Calming Kids: Creating a Non-Violent World, an anti-bullying program that has reached more than 30,000 kids nationwide. Her program (see calmingkids.org) trains school and health professionals how to teach a curriculum that helps children in grades K–12 reduce stress and avoid violence. PERI SNYDERMAN PO BOX 122 CHESTER, NY 10918-0122 SPECIALCAT@MSN.COM


JUNE 2–5


two sets of twins. Anna, 25, is researching eating disorders at Washing ton Uni ver sity in St. Louis and applying for doc- toral programs. An -


’81


thony, 25, is a radiology technician certi- fied in CT scans and MRIs and is studying to become a physician’s assistant. Danielle, 24, is a lead certified nursing assistant in a psychiatric hospital in New Jersey. Denise 24, a high school math teacher in Brock - ton, MA, graduated in May from North - eastern University with a bachelor’s and master’s in math. Holly was named CEO of the Visiting Nurse Association in Lee last year. She earned a master’s in nursing with high honors from the University of Hart ford in 2009. ELIZABETH DECKENBACH FELDER 42 EPPING ROAD EXETER, NH 03833-1521 LIZFELDER@YAHOO.COM


’82


Terry DeLouise Hellauer vaca- tioned with Pam Arons ’80 in


Las Vegas in April. Terry had a blast and loved getting to catch up with Pam. Steve Fugazy joined the Shepherds, a nonprofit allowing disadvantaged inner- city Connecticut youth a quality educa- tion at a nonpublic high school with the support of a positive role model in their lives. Anyone interested in learning about it can contact Steve (stfugazy@comcast.net) or visit shepherdsinc.com.


Holly Novack Van nucci has


Horse sense F


rom high-end global marketing to down- home animal husbandry, Andrew Philbrick


’80 directs a multifaceted enterprise, Hunter Farms Equestrian Center in Princeton, N.J. A seasoned junior rider and captain of Skidmore’s polo team, he was fresh out of college when he spotted a derelict stable and bought it. In a 2006 Town Topics interview, he said, “In the beginning, there were just two of us—myself and a groom— and we started pulling out weeds!” His small rid- ing school soon grew into a leading East Coast center for sport-horse training, showing, and marketing.


Philbrick himself has competed on the US


Equestrian Team from Dublin to Madrid to Cal - gary, won two World Cup grand prix events and five other grands prix in one year, owned and trained a Nations Cup–winning horse, trained horses and riders in five World Cup finals, and provided color commentary for TV’s Out door Life Network. A member of the US Equestrian Feder - ation’s show management committee, he also runs Princeton Show Jumping, which hosts fre- quent competitions including two USEF-rated shows that draw Olympic-level riders for five- figure prize money. With its high-tech arenas and dustless footing, Philbrick calls his facility “a little bit of Europe in New Jersey.” And with its 37 stalls for his own and his students’ horses, it’s always a lesson barn. “Nothing is more fun than riding and jump- ing a horse,” he told Town Topics, but a


close second is “pass- ing that fun on to some- one else,” whether an as piring national contender or a


young kid in his just-for- fun summer program.


Philbrick says training entails risk, respect, discipline, and “a special rapport.” Jumping, even more than other equestrian sports, forges a bond between horse and rider because “you and the horse together can do things that you can’t do separately. When that symbiotic relationship works, it is singular.” —SR


FALL 2010 SCOPE 49


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