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Sustainment and logistics soldiers from the 364th Expeditionary Sus- tainment Command helped manage supply yards and ammunition supply points for the more than 13,000 U.S. servicemembers participating in Op- eration Anakonda.


largest multinational exercises in the entire world. And it happened in a part of the world that is a powder keg of political unrest: Eastern Europe. Since the 2014 Ukrainian revo-


lution, Eastern Europe has been in upheaval. Russia is the biggest instigator, playing tug-of-war with Ukraine over the Crimean Peninsu- la. The Middle East’s refugee crisis also has spread across the European continent, as well as an increased amount of terrorist activity. Finan- cial turmoil has been another prob- lem. But from June 7–17, 24 NATO and partner nations sent troops into this cacophony of unrest for the exercise, which was hosted by the Polish military in different locations throughout Poland such as Oleszno, Szczecin, and Drawsko Pomorskie.


58 MILITARY OFFICER AUGUST 2016


Preparation for Poland “This is a total force exercise, which reflects the total force strategy of the Army,” says Army Reserve spokes- man Timothy Hale. These kinds of exercises, outside the usual sandbox, give servicemembers the opportu- nity to test their training in real-world scenarios. They have to tackle a huge range of challenges, which leads to a corresponding increase in task profi- ciency. Hale says, “This kind of activ- ity facilitates individual readiness at the ground level. And once you get individual readiness taken care of, unit readiness follows suit.” The 364th Expeditionary Sustain-


ment Command (ESC), commanded by Brig. Gen. Greg Mosser, spear- headed the Army Reserve efforts. The 364th ESC is headquartered in


PHOTOS: ABOVE AND PREVIOUS PAGE, MAJ. MARVIN BAKER, USA


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