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NEWS YOU CAN USE


Army ROTC Celebrates Centennial


This year, the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) turns 100 years old. The Army ROTC program was created when President Woodrow Wilson signed the National Defense Act of 1916. Shortly there- after, universities and colleges established official ROTC programs like that at the University of Florida (shown above, circa 1920). Today, there are 275 Army ROTC programs with more than 30,000 cadets enrolled.


Captain Crunch, Gun Muncher S


mall arms always have been an integral aspect of mili- tary service. New servicemem- bers learn to use them during basic training, hone those skills during marksmanship exercises, and employ them against the enemy in combat. But no gun, no matter how well


made, lasts forever. When a military pistol or rifle is no longer serviceable, it is sent to Annis- ton Army Depot (ANAD) in Alabama, where it meets its demise in the jaws of “Captain Crunch,” a massive indus- trial shredder that effortlessly tears


the weapon into tiny bits. ANAD is the only small-arms demilitarization center in the U.S. and receives weap- ons from all branches, notes Public Affairs Officer Clester Burdell. Captain Crunch began operating in the mid-1990s and is charged with demil- itarizing and dispos- ing of firearms in all shapes and sizes. The so-called


“Gun Muncher” has a voracious appetite


PHOTOS: RIGHT, JEREMY W. GUTHRIE, AMC; ABOVE, COURTESY WIKICOMMONS


and has been called upon to shred as many as 600 pistols and up to 2,000 rifles in a single session, which might extend over two or three days. In- terestingly, pistols are more difficult to destroy than rifles because they contain a greater number of small parts, all of which must be rendered useless. The result- ing pieces are sold as scrap metal. — Don Vaughan


online: Read the full “Captain Crunch, Gun Muncher”story online at www.moaa.org/captaincrunch. AUGUST 2016 MILITARY OFFICER 17


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