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signer for a health care company; and an Air Guard mas- ter sergeant serving in cyber future mis- sions for a communi- cations fl ight unit. “Cyber is going to


require a paradigm shift. The soldier who will excel at cyber is not neces- sarily the soldier who would serve in the Ranger regiment,” says Lt. Col. Woody Groton, ARNG, in New Hampshire. Maj. Edward


Bombita, ARNG, a signal offi cer with a degree in information systems, leads the Army National Guard’s 171st Cyber Protection Team, which activated this year. Having been involved with the Guard’s network defense operations for several years, the diff erence he observes now is the synchronization of priorities and resources between the NGB and the California adjutant general. Even the state of California recently has mandated threat assess- ments for state entities. Additionally, both the Army Guard


and Air Guard in California are char- ter members of the new California Cybersecurity Integration Center, which coordinates threat analysis among state agencies. “Now anything cyber is a priority,” Bombita says. “My primary eff ort involves recruit- ing members to the team.” Members of his team wear sig-


nal, military intelligence, and engineer branch insignia. These branches feed the cyber operations military occupa- tional specialty in the Army Guard and Air Guard. A few offi cers have gradu- ate degrees in computer security, some with an emphasis on cybersecurity. In their civilian jobs, one warrant offi cer teaches cybersecurity at a state college,


one offi cer is a CEO of a start-up IT company, another offi cer is a software developer, and another warrant offi cer works as a system administrator in the state network operations center.


Linking the private and public By conducting cyber exercises, the Guard reinforces existing relation- ships between Army and Air units and with critical infrastructure private and public providers. Exercises like Cyber Yankee and Cyber Shield, held in March 2015 in Indiana, aff ord profes- sionals representing local government, law enforcement, industry, academia, and the federal government (e.g., the FBI or the Department of Homeland Security) the opportunity to join those in utilities, state emergency manage- ment, and the Army Reserve. They work together to defend against cyber intrusions, most notably with the criti- cal infrastructure and industrial con- trol systems used in industries such as electrical power, water and waste water, oil and natural gas, transporta- tion, chemical, and manufacturing. The exercise environment allows


cyber warriors to conduct attack sim- ulations, threat mitigation, penetra-


tion testing, and cyber threat analysis on DoD dedicated cyber ranges. They harness the power of tools like Secu- rity Onion (network monitoring), Co- balt Strike (adversary simulations), and Wireshark (network protocol analyzer). Several cyber warriors re- marked the Guard cyber exercises provide a great advantage not avail- able at their civilian jobs. In the constantly evolving con-


tinuum of cyberspace, the National Guard is demonstrating its agility and adaptability to operate on the cyber battlefi eld. “National Guard strength in homeland cyber operations is the face- to-face military presence with state and local government and with public/ private companies,” says Lt. Col. Rich- ard Berthao, ARNG, director of Cyber Yankee 2016. “Now and in the future, these organizations will be able to de- pend on the Guard for cyber protection just like they do for assistance during emergencies such as fl oods, fi res, hur- ricanes, and blizzards.”


MO


— Beth Liechti Johnson is a retired Army colonel and former commander of the Army Reserve’s Western Information Operations Center. This is her fi rst article for Military Offi cer.


AUGUST 2016 MILITARY OFFICER 55


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