search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
xiX


Vision integration directive ratified as G3 standard


A VDMA protocol for machine vision integration has become an official G3 standard after being recommended by the G3 consortium.


The VDI/VDE/VDMA 2632 part 2 directive provides a guideline for preparing technical and functional specifications in machine vision. It gives fast and targeted project management direction when integrating machine vision systems into measuring and automation solutions. The directive is now available in an English/Chinese version, and joins other recognised G3 standards including EMVA 1288, GenICam, Camera Link and GigE Vision. The directive provides a


recognised, international common basis for vision integration, if there is need for clarification among project partners. Furthermore, it will help mitigate language barriers between English- and Chinese-speaking partners: each paragraph is printed in English and Chinese side by side. The G3 initiative is an


international consortium of major associations active in the field of machine vision. G3 members are the North American association AIA, the China Machine Vision Union, the European Machine Vision Association, the Japan Industrial Imaging Association, as well as the German engineering federation, the VDMA.


First graphene quantum dot-based CMOS sensor shows broadband imaging potential


Te Spanish research institute, ICFO, has developed what it says is the first graphene quantum dot- based CMOS integrated camera. Te study, published in Nature


Photonics, demonstrated monolithic integration of a CMOS integrated circuit with graphene, the first time this has been achieved according to ICFO. Te work resulted in a high-


resolution image sensor consisting of hundreds of thousands of photodetectors based on graphene and quantum dots (QD). Te new sensor is sensitive to UV, visible and infrared light at the same time, which is not possible with existing image sensors, the researchers say. Te graphene-QD image sensor


was fabricated by taking PbS colloidal quantum dots, depositing them onto the CVD graphene and subsequently depositing this hybrid system onto a CMOS wafer with image sensor dies and a read-out circuit. Stijn Goossens, one of the


authors of the paper, commented: ‘No complex material processing or growth processes were required


www.imveurope.com @imveurope


to achieve this graphene-quantum dot CMOS image sensor. It proved easy and cheap to fabricate at room temperature and under ambient conditions, which signifies a considerable decrease in production costs. Even more, because of its properties, it can be easily integrated on flexible substrates, as well as CMOS-type integrated circuits.’ Te study was led by ICREA


Professors, Frank Koppens and Gerasimos Konstantatos, in collaboration with the company Graphenea. Konstantatos commented: ‘We


engineered the QDs to extend to the short infrared range of the spectrum (1,100-1,900nm), to a point where we were able to demonstrate and detect the night glow of the atmosphere on a dark and clear sky, enabling passive night vision. Tis work shows that this class of phototransistors may be the way to go for high sensitivity, low-cost, infrared image sensors operating at room temperature, addressing the huge infrared market that is currently thirsty for cheap technologies.’


PCIe cameras for integrations 2 to 50 Mpix with high bandwidths flat flex cables (data, power, GPIO)


June 1-2, Hamburg, Booth 2


June 26-29, Munich,


Booth A2-446


As seen in XIMEA‘s 360° VR capture demo:


www.ximea.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56