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Embedded special


@imveurope


www.imveurope.com


Security video without pixels: The potential of embedded processing


Embedded vision looks set to disrupt the surveillance market, according to Michael Tusch of ARM, speaking at the Embedded Vision Summit


B


y 2030, most surveillance cameras will not produce video. Tis prediction was made by Michael Tusch, founder of UK


embedded imaging startup Apical, now owned by ARM, at the Embedded Vision Summit, an annual computer vision conference run by the Embedded Vision Alliance taking place from


1 to 3 May in Santa Clara, California. So what will IP cameras produce if not


video? Te answer Tusch gave is metadata, largely because the volume of information IP cameras generate is becoming increasingly difficult to transmit and store. Tusch noted that surveillance is one


traditional market ‘ripe for disruption’ by embedded vision, a term difficult to define but typically involves image processing onboard an embedded computing platform such as an ARM processor. To illustrate the scale of the problem, Tusch


first noted that IP cameras are cheap and that 120 million were sold in 2016, all of which can


26 Imaging and Machine Vision Europe • June/July 2017


stream in HD and at 30fps. He said that, assuming a single HD IP


camera streams at 10Mb/s, if all 120 million new IP cameras were connected to the internet, that would equate to 1.2 petabits per second of web traffic. At a monthly rate, that’s 400 exobytes per month, which is four times what Cisco projects global IP traffic to be this year.


Of course, not all those 120 million new


cameras are connected to the internet at the same time, and some are replacing old cameras, but this still shows that IP cameras contribute a lot of network traffic, Tusch said. Data transmission is one problem; storing it


Maksim Kabakou/Shutterstock.com


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