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FOCUS Water supplies


geographic information system (GIS) mapping software. When the water authority is planning a new fire hydrant installation, it informs the FRS of the proposal for review and for the submission of any requirements. Fire hydrants are tested and inspected, and


records of defects and repairs are kept by the Water Office. The fixing, maintaining and renewing of fire hydrants in locations required by the FRS is undertaken by the water authority, while the cost of providing, maintaining, renewing and abandoning fire hydrants is charged to the FRS. Where work is to be carried out on a fire hydrant by the water authority, notice must be given to the FRS to ensure that there is another water supply in the area to maintain sufficient fire cover. The cost of repairing or replacing a damaged


fire hydrant is also charged to the FRS, but if such damage is caused because of use other than for FRS purposes, and the use has not been authorised by the water company or was carried out illegally by a third party, the FRS will not be liable for the cost, subject to the provision of reasonable evidence.


Flood risks


As well as ensuring water is not wasted, HFRS is aware that the risk of flooding is ever present in the community’s mind, following the significant flooding in 2007 and subsequent years. The areas that HFRS serves have river networks that connect with the Humber estuary and are at risk of tidal surges, as


44 MAY 2019 www.frmjournal.com


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