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Water supplies


water escaping when the vehicle is in motion. Each tank location has either signs or markers on the driveway to provide the vehicle driver with information on where to stop the vehicle’s fill tower directly under the spout.


Water shuttle exercise


A typical water shuttle exercise sees portable dams (tanks) employed with large ‘dump valves’ in the tankers to provide quick emptying, thus allowing the vehicles to rapidly return to water sources to bring more water. Some tankers have multiple dump valves, on both the sides and rear, and can empty in a matter of seconds. In this operation, over 32,000 gallons (121,133 litres) of water were delivered in an hour, consistent with the Insurance Rating Bureau’s rules. The requirement for this area was to generate 500g/m (1,900 l/m) for an hour, with an additional 10% flow for spillage and leaks. Obviously some 30,000 gallons (113,562 litres)


of water on a typical fire would be a significant effort, but one always has to be ready for the ‘big one’, and an unusual situation. Of course, there are additional rules regarding what is done with the delivered water. These rules involve the number of equipped


firefighters on scene, their training levels, large stream devices, the type and capacity of on scene fire pumps, and allied firefighting equipment and tools. The results of all this


FOCUS


will provide up to a two thirds reduction in fire insurance rates for property owners. Such a saving is most important, from a property


owner’s perspective and also from a political standpoint for the sponsoring agency or group. But the real result is better fire protection and life safety, as well as a safer environment for firefighters to work in with an adequate water supply


Kirk Rosenhan is fire services coordinator for Oktibbeha County. For more information, view page 5


www.frmjournal.com MAY 2019


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