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Safety equipment Hydraulic powered eccentric cutting


machines have the advantage that the blade works eccentrically, as the driving does not take place in the centre of the blade. As a result of this, the blade can work in material with a depth greater than the radius of the blade – the typical working depth is about 25cm – and also in most materials. However, the disadvantage of the machine is that it requires hydraulic power provided by a separate hydraulic unit, and also requires cooling. Water cutting involves using water at high


pressure to cut an opening in a structure and the pressure can vary from 200 to 300 bar depending on the equipment in use. The water flow normally varies between 25 and 50 litres per minute, and an abrasive additive (cutting agent) is often required to cut through hard materials, for example roof materials. A cooling and suppression effect is achieved in conjunction with making an opening, and equipment for water cutting can normally cut through all the materials that are commonly found


Stefan Svensson is a firefighter and an instructor at the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency. For more information, view page 5


This article combines information from two previous publications by the author.


FOCUS


www.frmjournal.com MAY 2019


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