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Emergency response


With an extended flight time, UAVs offer high definition video and an extended flight range which ensures that the devices can operate reliably on long missions in harsh and dynamic environments. Proven in both military and commercial


deployments, drones have the ability to operate in 65km sustained winds and 90km gusts. The SkyRanger device is also used by the British Antarctic Survey and can withstand freezing temperatures as well as the dry and arid conditions of deserts, so it is well placed to deal with the varying conditions that FRSs face in the UK. Drone technology presents both UK FRSs and the broader emergency services with a vital new perspective, which allows commanders on the ground to make more informed decisions. Effectively helping to manage the risk for FRS crews and civilians along with the risks for the surrounding area, the aerial insight provided by drones means that firefighters and their equipment can be deployed efficiently to bring the situation to the most positive conclusion


MCL is a supplier of advanced electronic communications, information systems and signals intelligence technology to the defence and security sectors. For more information, view page 5


FOCUS


www.frmjournal.com MAY 2019


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