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“More importantly, buy the car that


you really love and do not just buy one you think will appreciate, as there is no guarantee. Similarly, buy a car that will suit your needs. If you want to use it to take your children to school, for example, then don’t buy a ‘fire breathing’ two-seater!” Keep in mind that classic cars


with the most residual value in the market have had as few owners as possible from new and come from low-production numbers. Rarity is a key driver in demand and asking price. Celebrity owners and provenance, from the factory onwards, to prove the authenticity of the vehicle also increase and sustain a car’s worth. Gavin Thorn, restoration manager at Hilton and Moss, agrees new investors


must be sure their heart’s desire is the genuine article. Rare models with parts missing have been known to be augmented by unscrupulous owners or dealers with parts from more common sister models. “Try and make sure the car has had as little restoration


work as possible in its life,” Thorn says. “We would much rather start with a barn find—a


dusty, non-running rusty car—that has not had patches cut out and welded in and been played around with, because it is a virgin canvas to start from. With that, you can guarantee the end result will be spectacular.” Thorn says there are nameplates to buy and restore to


the highest standard and still offer the buyer a return for far less than what its retail value would be, “and those are the kinds of cars our clients are looking to find.” However, it’s hard to find classic cars in an unrestored


state for restoration as demand to do just that has increased among buyers. That demand could mean a higher cost and a narrower return on investment, if the net gain is purely financial.


Below: Aston Martin made wealthy James Bond fans dreams come true by recreating 25 of its classic silver birch DB5 marques complete with 007’s gadgets for $3.5 million each


Buy the car that you really love and do not just buy one you think will appreciate


Driving a


hard bargain More than £32 million ($42


million) was achieved and several records were broken when Bonhams held its annual Festival of Speed


auction at Goodwood in 2018. 94 CAMPDENFB.COM


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