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In the same way families create trusts to protect their financial assets, we also need to consider protecting the wellbeing of each individual


Wellbeing has many


aspects. Whether we are talking about an eating disorder, addiction, a tendency to be physically inactive, difficulty sleeping, or feeling emotionally frozen, we are prone to inertia, procrastinating on issues until they reach crisis point, by which time it is often too late to act in an optimal way. Take for instance the fact that to raise issues


that have the potential to disrupt generational longevity is often taboo. Whatever the nature of a problem, we need to be able to address it before it becomes so entrenched that it is extremely challenging to resolve. As I discovered when I was just 35, our health


can fail unexpectedly at any age. Despite annual check-ups, I learned I had stage three cancer that had metastasized into 10 tumours. How to move from being told it’s “game over” to giving myself a slim shot at survival? Given that I was initially misdiagnosed,


who could I trust to guide me? I had no idea where to turn and had to figure it all out for myself, one step at a time, opting for 20 rounds of chemotherapy that were followed by three surgeries.


ISSUE 74 | 2018


After an 11-month challenge, I vowed to


ensure my two little boys never had to walk such a lonely path. I determined to create a system and structure for them whereby the guidance and support I so desperately lacked would be just a phone call away. Neither would this system be tailored


only to major threats to our wellbeing. I had seen the stress my mother endured when, because my father frequently travelled on business, she had to cope without support with the many mishaps that landed me in hospital when I was young—a third-degree stomach burn, a sprained ankle, a fractured wrist from soccer, three crushed bones in my back from a fall attempting to do pull- ups, and the occasion when I almost died from ingesting 17 iron pills thinking they were candy.


Top: Feisal Alibhai (second from


left) at Clayoquot


Wilderness Resort, Canada with his


younger son Kazim


(far left), his beloved Suz (second from right) and older son Mahdi (right)


CAMPDENFB.COM 37


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