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flooring


Antislip decking for new retail development


LAUNCHED this summer, the £140m Rushden Lakes development at Nene Valley in Northamptonshire is a new shopping and leisure park. The scheme offers more than 400,000sq ft of new retail and restaurant accommodation, together with leisure activities which are all set against the backdrop of a lake. The project, which comprises a 30-acre


development, will also link four existing nature reserves, identified as Sites of


Special Scientific Interest, to create the Nene Wetlands, a one mile square natural space for visitors and wildlife. More than 500,000sq ft of JB Antislip


Plus Smooth from Marley Eternit decking was installed in the development, creating a linear length of around 40km. The timber decking boards are designed


to provide a durable and effective external anti-slip surface to minimise any risk of slipping – even in adverse weather conditions.


JB Antislip Plus uses a formula of


resin-based aggregate inserts, which are injected into the deck board grooves. For the smooth boards required by this project, grooves were machined into the boards to receive the inserts. They are treated to either Use Class 3 (MicroPro) or Use Class 4 (Naturewood) to protect the decking and suit the project requirements.


www.marleyeternit.co.uk/decking Performance flooring products for Windmill


THE Grade 1 listed Heckington Windmill in Sleaford, Lincolnshire is the only working example of an eight-sailed windmill in the country and a local landmark in the midst of the Lincolnshire fens. Built in 1830, and now owned by


Lincolnshire County Council, the six storey working mill is managed and operated by


Heckington Windmill Trust who purchased the buildings and land surrounding the windmill with the help of a Heritage Lottery Fund grant. The Lottery grant, combined with contributions from other grant providers and well-wishers, have enabled the Trust to regenerate the dilapidated buildings surrounding the Mill – the Miller’s House, the Granary, the Saw Mill, Bakehouse, Piggeries and Cart Shed. Products from Saint-Gobain Weber’s


flooring range have been incorporated in the sensitive conversion of the Piggeries and Granary buildings, retaining character and function, which is now a visitor centre with an exhibition area and shop, designed by Cowper Griffith Architects, Whittlesford, Cambridgeshire. “The design removes later elements and


restores buildings and their functions, as well as making access for all. It was


34 leisuredab.co.uk


important to take great care to avoid ‘smartening up’ to emphasise the working status of the Windmill,” says architect Karen Lim. The floor was in very poor condition,


badly damaged and of different levels, all of which needed to be addressed. Weber specified weberfloor 4610 industry top, a UK manufactured industrial floor screed compliant with BS8204. The pumpable, rapid hardening and self-smoothing floor screed is ideal for levelling and smoothing floors subject to heavy traffic and abrasion. A damp proof course was initially installed


using weberfloor DPM, a moisture tolerant, epoxy resin damp proof system designed to bond to concrete surfaces when the concrete is still drying out and containing a high degree of moisture.


www.netweber.co.uk


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