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Company Profile www.parkworld-online.com


their mobile devices, collating bonus points to spend later. The technology translates across various industries and the ability to scan and purchase within a single mobile app has a number of benefits for theme parks.


PW: How receptive are smaller theme parks to your offer? MT: Any park, big or small, can benefit from the smart engagement platform and the additional mobile and digital technologies that can plug into it. We’ve recently started working with a family-run business which operates three amusement locations and two waterparks.


PW: How do you see the technology developing in the future and who or what is driving these changes? MT: The fact that as consumers we are able to do just about anything at the tap of a screen online, has shaped our expectations of the real world. When we shop online, Google presents us with relevant ads to up-sell and add-on, and Amazon immediately makes recommendations for our next purchase. Visiting a theme park should be no different. But to make this kind of personalisation possible in the physical world requires us to connect the insights we have from online and behavioural data, with each individual interacting with a theme park. The addition of technology such as facial recognition,


voice recognition, AI and wearables, is continuing to build the wealth of data that gives theme park operators the insights required to personalise a customer’s experience. They will use a visitor’s profile, preferences, intentions, past behaviour and purchase patterns to improve the next interaction, and the next, and so on.


64


While ‘big data’ has been talked about for years, I think


we’re seeing theme park operators truly start to understand the wealth of visitor data they’re collating and how they can use it.


“ Our success


has been from our ability to evolve


PW: What have been your biggest challenges? And your greatest successes? Technology companies focused on innovation often find roll- out is challenging in a large theme park. We, however, have teams of QA-testers and on-site project delivery teams whose expertise is to overcome all the challenges that emerge in a complex project. Our success has been from our ability to evolve; from purely focusing on the retail market, to selling hardware tills. We’ve gone from a leading POS software company to a business that I believe is at the forefront of smart engagement. We understand the consumer, we understand the requirements of today’s technology and we take that knowledge and work closely with our customers to ensure theme parks are the epitome of a smart-resort.


MT: Parting thoughts? Consumers want a relationship with parks and destinations, just as they do with any established brand and they want that point of engagement to be via the device of their choice. Before, during and after their visit, the whole experience has to be easy and enjoyable so guests can order ahead, avoid queuing, pay quickly and reserve seating easily. Investing in technology to achieve this and address all


demographics can be a real challenge. Our own research found 95% of visitors said the features in a park’s app would make them spend more. That’s a stunning figure. But the same simplicity and relevance that makes apps so effective must be available across fixed tills, mobile checkouts and kiosks. It’s why smart engagement is so crucial.


JUNE 2019





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