search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Motion-based rides www.parkworld-online.com


Picture courtesy of Simex SimEx-Iwerks Entertainment


Technology in motion


We take a look at the various incarnations of motion-based rides


Mack Media and MackAnimation


Most motion simulator rides are presented in theatres of various shapes and sizes.


A Motion platforms can provide movement in all of the six degrees of freedom


(DOF) that can be experienced by an object that is free to move, such as an aircraft or spacecraft. These are the three rotational degrees of freedom (roll, pitch, yaw) and three translational or linear degrees of freedom (surge, heave, sway). So although riders never move more than a few inches in any direction, they can feel as if they are accelerating wildly, speeding, free falling, and other sensations. Special effects such as wind, water and smells are now widely use and only


add to the illusion. One of the earliest motion simulator rides is Star Tours at the Disney parks. When it debuted at Disneyland in 1987, the original Star Tours was the first major motion simulator attraction at a theme park, its virtual reality concept creating a new era for park attractions. It uses 40-passenger cabins that are mounted on motion bases. Other rides use different motion base configurations. Individual seats might have their own motion controls; sometimes, rows or sections of seats move together. In Despicable Me Minion Mayhem at the Universal Parks, for example, the theatre is divided into sections of seats, with each section having its own motion base. Most motion simulator rides are also 4D rides.


46


What’s next…. A roller coaster capable of doing spin-outs and other racing moves was unveiled at last year’s IAAPA by innovative ride manufacturer Dynamic Attractions. “The Dual Power Coaster is the world’s most advanced roller coaster vehicle,” said Hao Wang, President, Dynamic Attractions. “Most coasters are all about the track. That is only half of the excitement in this ride, where the cart itself is powered and moves, creating racing sensations never possible before on a roller coaster.” The unique roller coaster vehicles have new technology that allow four


degrees of freedom (4-DOF); these motion platforms enable each vehicle to pitch forward, roll side-to-side, change heading, and heave up and down while moving along the track. Wang explains how this feels to guests, “The Dual Power Coaster simulates drifting, air time, 360-spin outs, and other racing phenomena which have been impossible up until now.” In addition to the 4-DOF motion platform, it has dual propulsion. The combination of On-Board drive and an Off-Board Linear Synchronous Motor drive heightens the experience for guests. “Imagine racing on a track and then suddenly ‘powering-up’ to boost your speed,” said Wang.


JUNE 2019


motion simulator ride uses seats that move in sync with images of the outside world projected onto a screen to create the illusion of moving and physically participating in the action.


A sub-genre of the concept is the roving motion base simulator ride. Using a


vehicle that is mounted on a motion base, it combines a dark ride with a motion simulator ride. The vehicles move through a series of scenes that include actual, practical set pieces. But the sets also include screens onto which action is projected, and with which the vehicles move in tandem.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104