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Company Profile www.parkworld-online.com


Personalisation and monetisation


Founded in 1992, and headquartered in the UK, Omnico’s cloud-based technology powers POS and customer engagement solutions across six of the top 10 global theme park resorts, as well as leading retail and hospitality brands. Park World caught up with CEO Mel Taylor to find out what the buzz is all about…


PW: How does your unified transaction engine work? MT:We’ve built a central engine with software that unifies crucial data about individual guests from every digital and mobile touchpoint. It means the same detailed information about each visitor is shared between fixed-point checkouts in the merchandise store, kiosks at food and beverage stands, mobile order ahead apps, the hotel spa and so on. It is called “smart engagement”.


PW: What are the benefits for the operator? MT: Two words – personalisation and monetisation. Operators enjoy major gains in overall efficiency and profitability because they are getting so close to each guest and meeting individual requirements and tastes. It covers everything from managing capacity around the park, to tailoring stock levels. Guests find it so much easier to spend because of much greater personal relevance and simplicity. If, for example, merchandise visitors want is not in stock, it can be brought to


them or dropped off at a convenient location. And because they can see waiting times and menus at restaurants, guests are more likely to take a decision and book a table or order ahead. The park manages demand far more effectively. Smart engagement transforms loyalty too, because reward points are right there for visitors to use, regardless of where they are or the touchpoint – physical or digital.


PW: How does it also improve the guest experience? MT: Smart engagement takes all the hassle out of a visit. Each guest enjoys a truly personalised experience, without the need to repeat details more than once. They can, for example, use the same smartphone app to pay for whatever they want across the park, its hotel and restaurants. Wherever they are they see their loyalty and reward points and can spend them. They can always find their exact size or colour in merchandise which the park sends where they want to collect it. They can see


JUNE 2019


waiting times at restaurants and avoid queues and lines. With a smart engagement platform, a dedicated park app becomes a genius tool for running an entire visit for a family. Everybody wins.


PW: Can you offer an example? MT: For Dubai Parks and Resorts we installed a single, integrated point-of-sale (POS) system across all the parks’ retail and hospitality sites. This includes 359 POS lanes across the retail, restaurant and entertainment sites, as well as pre-booking and table management systems for their dining experiences. It illustrates how you need all the transaction touch points to talk to a single engine to ensure consistency for the visitor across the park. Another example is our work with Coop Denmark. While not a theme park, we worked with them on a self-scan mobile app, allowing shoppers to scan and purchase items from the store direct from


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