search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Company Profile www.parkworld-online.com


the option to purchase rides off the peg, many of our projects are the result of them coming to us with an idea which we then work with them to develop - with us, it’s more of a partnership.”


Leading the way as a top exporter Edward joined the company in 2014 bringing with him over 20 years’ experience on the operator side at Drayton Manor. “I was involved with the purchasing of many rides and attractions during my time at Drayton, including a Simworx 4D Theatre, so having been sat on the other side of the table, I al- ways think, ‘what would I want to know?’ I’ll often ask the client ‘have you thought of this, have you thought of that?’, to make sure the attraction is absolutely right for them.” It’s an approach that seems that seems to be


working - the company has grown exponentially in the last few years, a “real highlight” being its inclusion in the Sunday Times Heathrow SME Export Fast Track 100 listing, says managing director Terry Monkton when I meet with him later. The table ranks Britain’s top 100 small and medium-sized (SME) companies with the fastest growing international sales over two years. Simworx hit the 2016 league table at number 49. The listing is compiled by Fast Track and published in The Sunday Times each May. It is sponsored by Heathrow Airport and sup-ported by the government’s Exporting is GREAT campaign. To qualify for the table companies must have total sales of between £5m and £25m in the most recent year, with international sales at least 20% of total sales. Entrants must also have an average two-year international sales growth of between 30% and 360% per annum and staff numbers of between 10 and 400. In 2015 Simworx completed the acquisition of


RoboCoaster, an internationally recognised developer of Intellectual Property for use in passenger carrying robotic technology and trackless


dark rides. The two companies had been working together for two years prior to the acquisition under a highly suc-cessful Teaming Agreement, combing RoboCoaster’s pioneering robotics capability with Simworx’s motion simulation and audio visual experience - and there have been many exciting innovations since, says Edward.


Showtime! On my way to the new testing facility, where I am about to see the new Mini Flying Theatre being assembled and tested ready for a client in Vietnam (all Simworx products are tested and assembled in the UK), I also meet with the head of quality control, Ian Taylor. He explains that there are stringent processes in place to ensure the seamless integration of its rides and attractions into parks all over the world, with each project being individually assigned


to a team to see it through from concept to com- pletion. And should the client wish their Simworx product to be serviced by the company’s highly trained service engineers in the months and years ahead, that can be arranged too, he says. Stepping down into the factory, I am greeted by


an AGV (Automated Guidance Vehicle), which Ed- ward describes as “the next generation of trackless dark ride transportation”; no tracks no power ca-bles, and with an acceleration of 0.3G “it’s unrivalled in the industry,” he says. Unfortunately, I’m just that little bit too early to try it out, first demonstrations are to take place here in a couple of weeks and the company is “already talking to parks." Available with a variety of different motion systems, seating capacities and on-board 4D effects, combined with a custom designed AV solution, the first Simworx AGV dark rides will start appearing in parks worldwide from soon and are sure to be a hit. We also pass a version of the Paradrop VR,


created in partnership with adventure attractions special-ist, Frontgrid. Designed for indoor theme parks, family entertainment centres and destination visitor attractions, the ride combines self-controlled physical movement with free-roam virtual reality content to deliver a highly realistic paragliding sensation - and sales are literally soaring. Leading me through to the new testing facility,


Edward explains the reason for taking on the new space is to be able to demonstrate even more of the Simworx product range to clients from June on-wards. It’s here that I get to see the to see the Mini Flying Theatre. An innovative product, the Mini Flying Theatre enables 20 riders per cycle to experience unique movements perfectly synchronised with a movie being played on a 1/4 dome screen. Provided in full turnkey solutions, it is supplied with surround sound audio and a HD/2K or 4K 3D projection system. Service engineer Ross McNeil shows me the plans, talks me through the pre-show and around the ride itself so that I can visualise it in action, while explaining all the different elements that need to be tested and signed off before the product can be


JUNE 2019 43


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104