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Fire & CO Legislation


Fire Building Regulations – are you up to date?


The aim is for all homes in Scotland to have an increased level of Fire and CO protection by the end of 2020.


In the aſtermath of the Grenfell Fire tragedy, Scotland has reviewed its laws on the installation of smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms to provide a higher standard of protection throughout all Scottish homes. Ian Ballinger (pictured), Certification Manager for FireAngel, explores how legislation in England and Wales differs from Scotland – and the potential changes that professionals should be aware of.


protection than the UK for some time, with their Building Regulations going well above those specified in England and Wales. Scotland and Northern Ireland’s (NI) technical handbooks state a minimum Category LD2 system is required, whereas in England and Wales a LD3 system is the minimum requirement. These regulations define the legal levels of minimum protection required for each property. LD3 requires the installation of smoke alarms


S


in circulation spaces that form part of escape routes, such as landings and hallways, whilst LD2 takes this one step further by also requiring the installation of alarms in areas that are either high


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cotland and Northern Ireland have been at the forefront of providing their residents with higher levels of fire


risk or the principle habitable room, such as a kitchen or living room.


Whilst Scotland has been ahead of England


and Wales with regard to both fire and CO safety for a considerable time, it has now taken this one step further following a consultation on the installation of fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes. The consultation sought views on potential changes to standards required for fire and smoke alarms in domestic properties in Scotland, which closed on 1st December 2017, prompting the Scottish government to implement a change in the law regarding the installation of fire and smoke alarms. The change, which is planned to be


introduced by Autumn 2018, has been designed to provide a greater level of protection for all types of properties within Scotland, whether


these are owned, privately rented or as part of a social housing scheme. Whilst private landlords across the UK have


more recently had stricter fire regulations they must comply to following the 2015 Building Regulations, the legislation regarding social housing has often been unclear, with many tenants unsure of their legal rights with regard to fire and CO safety. The aim is for all homes in Scotland to have an increased level of Fire and CO protection by end 2020. This level of protection is significantly higher than the LD3 requirement specified for properties located within England and Wales, resulting effectively in a postcode lottery of protection determined by geographical location in the UK. However, following the release of Dame Hackitt’s post-Grenfell report, which


●Continued over September 2018 electrical wholesaler | 47


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