search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Wiring Accessories ●From previous page How Click Smart works.


rotary dimmer with the retractive switch and add the receiver to the light fitting. This will instantly stop any flickering that may have occurred.


3. Introduce two-way dimming control from separate locations (wired).


If you have a 2-way switch upstairs and a dimmer downstairs you can turn the light on from the switch. Once dimmed with the rotary dimmer, there is no way for you to increase the brightness. You can only switch the lights on and off at the same brightness. This means you have to walk downstairs which can be hazard if the lighting is set at a low level. By using a multi-functional dimming receiver and two retractive switches, you will be able to dim from both locations, meaning no more risky trips down the stairs in the dark.


4. Add a switch to an outdoor socket for multiple appliances. There are many reasons you may want to add a wireless switch to an outdoor socket, for example switching a light, controlling an outdoor appliance / sprinklers or the ability to switch off power for security. By adding a smart switch and a receiver to the already powered socket, you will be able to control it from anywhere in your home.


The future is definitely smart and, as more consumers become


switched on to the idea of being able to control heating, lighting and security in their homes, so the


demand for electricians to install the products that will bring this control will continue to rise.


The future is definitely smart and, as more consumers become switched on to the idea of being able to control heating, lighting and security in their homes, so the demand for electricians to install the products that will bring this control will continue to rise. If installers are put off by complicated and costly smart control systems, they can start with a back to basics system that offers all the control without the complexity, time, disruption and cost. The installation of a system like Click Smart is simple and flexible, with no additional cables or wall cutting required, making it ideal for installation within existing or newly constructed buildings. Receivers can be installed behind light fittings or into suitable installation boxes and can be utilised with existing wiring. Existing receivers can also be paired with a universal input switch which converts up to 4 push-button switches. With Click Smart, you can move switches freely, relocate them when required and switches can be mounted on glass, wood or walls etc. Smart Switches are mainly powered by battery, so do not require any wiring or additional power supply. With Click Smart you have complete control, and the range allows portable and remote control up to a distance of 200m. Manual and automatic control and adjustment of lights, on/off or lighting scene creation, as well as controlling shutters, blinds, gates, latches and garage doors are all possible.


By arming themselves with latest information on products, technologies and legislation, wholesalers are in a prime position to add value to their customers. With contractors under increasing pressure to complete projects within tight deadlines and budgets, wholesalers can be advising them on products that will deliver faster installation.


Click Smart Smart Box makes homes smarter. www.scolmore.com 24 | electrical wholesalerSeptember 2018 www.ewnews.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68