search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Lighting ●From previous page


come pre-wired and are rated to IP65 for dust and water protection for extra durability in outdoor applications.


An opportunity not to be missed It’s no secret that we live in a fast-paced, technologically dominated world. Trends like wellbeing along with others like sustainability and modular building, will set the course for businesses and those working in the built environment for many years to come. While ensuring adequate lighting is needed,


GESM-AC


there should also be due consideration for another contributor to wellbeing, namely ventilation. Innovative air conditioning solutions can bring about better air quality and comfort for occupants. The GESM-AC for example is a battery-operated control that communicates with air conditioning units through passive infrared (PIR) technology. It is also designed for retrofit applications, so that installation and programming is easy and intuitive. Lighting and ventilation of course plays a big


shortages is already limiting construction activity across the board, while simultaneously increasing labour costs. The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) has reported that the industry will need to find 157,000 new recruits by 2021 in order to keep up with demand. These two factors mean that for wholesalers, it can be hard to capitalise, even if wellbeing is front and centre. Modern lighting controls are now designed to overcome these challenges though, and solutions that are simple but effective are readily available for contractors to choose from. Automatic dimming sensors, for instance, can be installed as a standalone product or as part of


Lighting should be positioned to


combat dark areas, and the lighting should be bright enough for visible hazards to be


identified. Users can now have complete control over their lighting, meaning


lights can be set up to be dimmed instead of switching off entirely to keep an area appropriately lit.


20 | electrical wholesalerNovember 2019 ewnews.co.uk


a fully addressable system. These intelligent detectors can measure the natural daylight coming in and dim the artificial lighting to the appropriate lux level. Many standalone detectors are no-fuss when it comes to installation and programming. Detectors from the CP Electronics green-i range, for example, have integral power supplies, and many are programmable through push buttons or user-friendly infrared remote controllers. Options like retrofit detectors that mount onto existing luminaires are also widely available now too. These retrofit solutions minimise hassle by taking away the need to change luminaires. For added ease and reliability, look for detectors that


part in the grand scheme of wellbeing. In addition to improving productivity of those in the workplace, studies have demonstrated; improved recovery from those in surgery, a boost in sales in the retail industry and even have a positive effect on test grades among students. To ensure that this trend does not pass them


by, wholesalers must ensure they are ready to meet the growing demand for lighting and HVAC controls. This starts with wholesalers gaining suitable knowledge and therefore being able to provide solutions to help contractors fulfil projects using fit-for-purpose products.


For more about CP Electronics and its lighting control solutions, please visit: cpelectronics.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56