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Cable Management Tracking the trends


Tri-rated panel wiring has been a mainstay of the UK panel building industry for many years. Now, the market is continually evolving as panel builders drive toward smaller and lighter panels and increasingly look to save space and reduce panel weight and overall cost.


O


ne such way of cutting the cost is in the use of more flexible cables. With highly flexible cables, lengths can be cut shorter, reducing the space required, weight of equipment and the


cost of valuable copper. In response to this, Clynder Cables in Manchester has developed its


Superflex range – a selection of highly flexible Tri-rated cables to accompany its standard Tri-rated range. The Superflex series comes in sizes from 16mm2 up to 240mm2, cables


that are so flexible it is possible to tie a knot in the 240mm2, one of the largest sizes. There are two main reasons for this high degree of flexibility: The first, and most important, lies in the construction of the wire. The Superflexes use Class 6 conductors – the diameter is the same as the regular Class 5 conductor used in the standard Tri-rated cables, but the wire strands are smaller and there are a far greater number, allowing a vastly improved bend radius. Secondly, they rest in the properties of the Tri-rated compound that Clynder has developed with its suppliers, making Clynder’s cables some of the most flexible currently available in the UK market. Both Superflexes and regular Tri-rateds are also available as double


insulated. This is where a second PVC extrusion is applied over the first. Double insulated cables excel in instances where some mechanical protection is required, but cable trays are not practical or available.


Low smoke cables Another recent change in the market is the growing demand for Low Smoke Zero Halogen (LSZH). These include 2491B / 6701B (H05Z-K / H07Z- K). These panel wires are often used for equipment in sensitive public areas such as schools and hospitals to prevent the smoke and toxic fumes in a fire situation, where there could be a threat to life or possible damage to equipment.


Clynder Cables has noticed an increase in the demand for its 2491B / 6701B cables in recent months and anticipates further increases over the next few years.


Consistency guaranteed With Clynder Cables’ products, you can always guarantee consistency with bright deep colour shades that simply do not fade over time and do not vary from one batch to the next. In addition, with the flexibility of their


2491B / 6701B (H05Z-K / H07Z-K) panel wires are oſten used for


equipment in sensitive public areas such as schools and hospitals to


prevent the smoke and toxic fumes in a fire situation, where there could be a threat to life or possible damage to equipment.


ewnews.co.uk June 2019 electrical wholesaler | 15


compound, the cables do not retain their shape of the reel (the so-called spring coil effect), meaning that 100% of the cable on the reel can be used. As a British cable supplier, Clynder is unique in that all of its Tri-rated cables are manufactured on site in Manchester UK. This allows greater flexibility and shorter lead times for made to order products. With one of the widest stock ranges of panel wire available in the UK. along with an excellent level of service, high manufacturing standards and stringent quality controls make Clynder Cables the brand of choice.


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