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CATDV UPDATE GAINS GOOD REVIEWS – AND APPROVAL MANAGE


Quantum BY DAVID FOX


Quantum has released the latest version of its CatDV content management, curation and orchestration software platform, with major new features, performance enhancements and a range of new deployment options to address the needs of agile content production teams. The update introduces a new


review and approval framework with real-time messaging, support for clip stacking meta-folders to fl exibly organise content with versioning to make team- based collaboration faster and more focused, and many more new features, including Nvidia- accelerated transcoding. Dave Clack, VP and general manager, cloud software and analytics, Quantum, said: “CatDV is a deep technology platform that allows our customers extreme fl exibility to build custom


RACKING UP THE NEWS ON THE MOVE CREATE & PRODUCE


Appear BY JO RUDDOCK Clack: CatDV now delivers “new levels of production effi ciency”


workfl ows and adapt to rapidly evolving collaboration needs. The new review and approval framework, when combined with the clip stacking and versioning features, gives creative teams extraordinary fl exibility to build highly specialised and effi cient workfl ow automation for new levels of production effi ciency.” This latest version of CatDV plays a key role alongside other recently introduced systems from Quantum, such as its Web Scale Content Archive Reference Architecture and Collaborative


Workfl ow Solution for creative teams. The latter is an example of the increased performance possible with a tight integration of software, hardware and services. This integrates a turnkey, ready- for-production deployment of Quantum StorNext shared storage, CatDV and a range of options for adding archiving capacity into the petabyte range and beyond. Quantum claims the option to choose Nvidia RTX GPU-based transcoding means broadcasters can dramatically accelerate content transcoding workfl ow steps.


DROP-IN VERSATILITY AND DURABILITY COMES INTO VIEW


CREATE & PRODUCE Breakthrough


Filters BY DAVID FOX


The new Cinema DFM (or drop-in fi lter mount) from Breakthrough Filters is a versatile PL fi lter mount that can fi t a wide range of camera systems, including Sony E, Canon RF, Red DSMC2 VV, Fuji X, Leica L- Mount, Nikon Z and MFT, with Arri in development. Users can drop in one of


more than 30+ fi lters, including a selection of Neutral Density, polarised virtual ND, night sky and infrared. Cinema DFM has been designed with large- format sensors in mind. Breakthrough Filters has also introduced what it claims is the fi rst 1.5 to 11-stop X4


The new X10 DSNG is tailor- made for digital satellite news gathering (DSNG). It features a switch module, with built-in satellite reception and ASI IO ports, that supports encoding and satellite uplink in a single 1RU chassis. DSNG vans are often needed in conjunction with outside broadcast trucks to support live production for large events. For such vehicles, it’s vital to have equipment that can deliver content via satellite or IP ports to support the use of satellite and fi bre delivery simultaneously.


69


Appear claims the X10 DSNG


provides such functionality, which DSNG operators need for contribution including encoding/decoding and satellite uplink/downlink. The X10 DSNG can support 1G to 10G of traffi c and features a switch module with dual 1G IP IO ports, satellite demodulator and two ASI IO ports, an encoder module, a satellite modulator module and a decoder module. Common compression technologies and video protocols are supported, while the programmable hardware can support emerging standards. With the modular nature of the X10 DSNG, additional compression standards can be supported through adding JPEG XS and JPEG2000 features.


The X10 DSNG supports both fi bre and satellite delivery


SPECTRA DRAWS VAIL ACROSS MULTI-SITE MULTI-CLOUD STORAGE


MANAGE Spectra Logic BY DAVID FOX


Vail has been added to Spectra Logic’s data storage and management ecosystem. A distributed software designed


A Cinema DFM virtual density fi lter fi tted to a Red Komodo


VND, with very well controlled colour neutrality without any X-pattern. The Cinema X4 VND incorporates a 0.8 MOD for motor control and optical density indicators. Also on offer is a 1-stop Drop-In Rota Pola, which is currently the fastest polariser.


Graham Clark, founder of


Breakthrough Filters, said: “Our design principle for the DFM was to be a universal


fi lter system, so the drop- in fi lter could easily be interchangeable between different cameras, even different camera systems,” added Clark. “The result is an ultralight, behind-the-lens fi lter system machined from titanium and aluminium alloys.” The rugged weather-sealed mount and TacLock locking system can handle extreme shooting environments.


to provide universal access and placement of data across multi- site and multi-cloud storage, Vail is claimed to enable seamless hybrid and multi-cloud workfl ows. The company says it can unify and safeguard data, no matter where


that data is located, whether in the cloud, multiple clouds, or on premises in multiple sites. Spectra Logic is fortifying its entire range, including its StorCycle Storage Lifecycle Management software, and its family of enterprise-class tape library systems, against the impact of ransomware and other cyberthreats with the addition of ‘Attack-Hardened’ features that help protect customers from cyberattacks, and offer them improved business continuity through rapid restore of clean data after an attack.


Throwing a Vail around the world – Vail’s Dashboard Map


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