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Design


The lap of D 48


eco-luxury


Buoyed by efforts to combat climate change and the rapidly intensifying focus on sustainability, a new generation of eco-hotels and nature resorts are expanding around the globe. Billed as impressive hospitality ventures in their own right, these properties are made with local materials and powered by sustainable energy sources, emphasising clean living principles along with a respect for the fragile ecosystems they inhabit. Will Moffi tt speaks to architects working to craft the next generation of hotels that seek to protect the earth – rather than simply pay homage to it.


uring the tumultuous April months of 2020, as large portions of the globe went into lockdown, the internet became awash with images of a world cleansing itself from the stain of human activity. Pictures of crystal blue Venetian waters and profoundly clear views of the snow- capped peaks of the Himalayas were shared online, racking up millions of likes on Twitter and Instagram. For many, those sights were a powerful reminder of what could be achieved if big business took a backseat and climate change became policy makers’ number one priority. For others, those photographs simply served as positive motifs, brightening up otherwise gloomy in trays stuck in a pandemic- stricken news cycle.


Fast forward 18 months, and climate change is back on the news agenda as extreme weather events have decimated countries across the globe. Between floods that devastated parts of China, Germany and Belgium, record-breaking heatwaves in North America and Pakistan, and wildfires blazing across swathes of Turkey, Greece and Italy, the earth, it seems, is far from ‘healing’. In fact, it is in terminal pain. As if the scope and scale of such events wasn’t enough, there is now ample science to support the notion that these extreme weather catastrophes are caused by human activity. Speaking of the heatwave that sent temperatures in the Canadian village of Lytton soaring to 49.6ºC, the World Weather Attribution (WWA) argued that it would be “virtually


Hotel Management International / www.hmi-online.com


Sigge architects


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